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CRIKEY!!!!Coral snake!

firestopper

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#1
Found this little fellow in our back yard! Wife was taking the dogs out for a potty break when she noticed it.
I recognized it right away as a coral and released it away from the yard and more importantly our dogs.
This is the second coral snake I've seen in the "wild", both of which have been on our property. Kinda cool really.
IMG_1634.JPG IMG_1633.JPG
The yellow was washed a bit with the porch light.

Peace,
Paco
 

FOMOGO

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#3
Depends on the species, "red and yellow will kill a fellow". Like all the rest of us, they have a place in the scheme of things. Sounds like you handled it well Paco. Out our way we just have prairie rattler's, but you still treat them with respect. Mike
 

firestopper

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#4
The coral snake is the second most venomous snake known to man behind the Black mamba but they are very small and its almost impossible for them to bite given the size of their head. They have bitten people between the fingers (webs) and toes. Their fangs are short and weak for the most part but care should be taken when handling them. A dog could be easily bitten on their soft tongue though. Here's a link for some good reading. http://www.desertmuseum.org/books/nhsd_coral_snake.php
In the first photo you can clearly see the black head past the eyes and the bands encircled the body.
I have dispatched several (a lot) diamond back rattlesnakes over the years around the property and inside my garage but these guys deserve a second chance as rare as they are.
 

4gsr

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#5
Over here in the river bottoms of Texas and along the Gulf coast to Florida, They get up to about 3 foot long and big around as your thumb! When we lived over by Conroe, Texas years back, we had a cat that killed one that measured 25" long. Yuck!

Edit: That's a different coral snake from that we have in our state. Interested article. Thanks for sharing.
 
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jim18655

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#7
I had the dog out for a walk last year up in the mountains. I stopped to look for my lens cap and heard a noise. The dog was about 20 feet ahead of me on a narrow path. I didn't recognize the sound - thought it was an insect - and then saw the dog looking at a 3' timber rattlesnake coiled on a rock next to the path. Luckily he's afraid of his own shadow and has a good recall. The garter snake bite on his nose earlier in the year might have helped also.
 

extropic

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#8
I assume that your wife took the pictures. Kudos to her for having the fortitude to come that close and hold that steady. Many (most?) would not.
 

4gsr

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#9
Are those fange proof gloves you are wearing there?
 

Groundhog

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#10
That coral snake sure is pretty.

Prairie rattlers here in the Kansas prairies - naturally! :rolleyes:
Short fat and ugly. But on the positive side they are ill tempered, mean and can inject huge amounts of potent venom in each bite.
 

firestopper

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#11
I assume that your wife took the pictures. Kudos to her for having the fortitude to come that close and hold that steady. Many (most?) would not.
Haha, she's not a girly girl. She has caught scorpions, killed her fair share of nasty black widows and centipedes . She normally will name the tarantulas found in the back yard and leave them be. She refuses to pick up snakes or river toads leaving those to me. If we didn't have dogs, we would likely let them move on eventually but a bite would result in a hefty vet bill with no guarantee. The river toads (monsoon season) have claimed many dogs. Simply licking them can be fatal, I probably evicted 10-15 toads this year alone.
 

4gsr

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#12
River toads? That's a new one for me. And fatal to a dog? What do they look like?
 

firestopper

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#13
Are those fange proof gloves you are wearing there?
They are for Arizona coral snakes as they have a small head and small fixed (non hinging) fangs. I normally hold venomous snakes just behind the head (no gloves) but this little guy would have likely been killed if I grabbed it like that. Don't get me wrong gentlemen, I have a hefty respect for these creatures and only deal with them to keep my pack safe and sound.
 

extropic

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#15
I was born and raised in Tucson (left after 11th grade, 1965) but had totally forgotten about those toads until you mentioned them. Those were the days.
 

jim18655

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#16
Glad you just remove them. Too many people have to kill every snake they see. I've watched a lot of people swerve into the other lane to run one over.
 

juiceclone

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#17
re: the toads, here in Florida they're called Bufo Toads....yeah they can and have killed dogs and cats..If u pick one up it will exude a white toxin on either side of the head and u definitely want no cuts on the hands near that ...wash after ..otherwise they're just another weird thing....suckers get BIG though...had a neighbor that used to put dog food out so she could watch the toads gather ??? !!
 

Bob La Londe

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#18
My first summer out of high school I had a job maintaining the drip irrigation systems at Southwest Desert Farms Inc. Routinely I'd find little sidewinders curled up under the end of a dripping pressure cap on a line. The wet spot and the drip would cool by evaporation quite cool, and by morning when I was walking the lines the little guys were so cool they were lethargic. I'd scoop them up with a shovel and fling them back over the fence into the desert. Then I could put my thumb over the cap a couple times to clear the sand and stop the drip. We have a variety of rattlers here in the desert. Most are more common than sidewinders, but it was always sidewinders I'd find chilling under a dripping pressure cap. Some mornings I'd see three or four of them like that.
 

eugene13

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#19
I was born in Tucson and raised on a small place in the foothills of the Catalina mountains near Bear Canyon, we always had a lot of rattelers, until my dad found the den, five gallons of heating oil did the trick.
 

firestopper

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#20
Man I hope I done have a den of Coral snakes. It weird, been living in Tucson since 1973 and only seen two coral snakes in nature, both of them on our property one year apart. Its possible its the same one but I cant be that lucky:(.
 

core-oil

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#21
As the wee guy is not toxic, It would be a blessing to have something as beautiful in your garden
 

Groundhog

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#24
Coral snakes are venomous. Its my understanding its a quite potent neurotoxin.
I've read that the bite of a coral snake is among the most deadly in the world. And the toxins give almost no warnings before you are in very serious trouble.

However, the coral snake will never wear the pumpkin image of this guy!
snake.jpg
 

firestopper

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#25
I've read that the bite of a coral snake is among the most deadly in the world. And the toxins give almost no warnings before you are in very serious trouble.

However, the coral snake will never wear the pumpkin image of this guy!
View attachment 243849
Correct on the Coral snake.
Thats a beautiful Python?
 

core-oil

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#26
Sorry Guys,

I read it wrong! He is still nice lookihg, And I would give him a wide berth, Fortunately in the U.K. we only have one poisonous snake The Adder, By and large one has as much chance of coming across one as one has of winning the lottery, Back to lurking behind my lathe

I would still prefer to face up to a poisonous reptile than those damned spiders , centipedes and scorpions , They are gross and offensive Yuk!
 

Bob La Londe

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#27
Well, here in the Southwest we have all those critters to. Spiders, snakes, centipedes, and scorpions. I've had tracks across my foot from a centipede, and I've been nailed by sand scorpions twice. Even got bit by a tiny little spider once. Picked something up and felt a tiny little pin prick. Turned it over and there was a little black spider about 1/4 inch (6.35 mm) across from leg tip to leg tip. Never had any reaction to the spider. The bite mark didn't even get red. Had some tingling around the sting from the scorpions for about 20 minutes. Sand scorpions aren't to bad. Now snakes I give a wide berth if I can. I've seen a couple people deathly ill from rattlesnake bites.
 

firestopper

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#28
A few years back I came across this Gila monster while cleaning the head (bathroom) in the firehouse. This guy is small but still venomous that delivers a painful bite.
The Gila monster and the Mexican beaded lizard are the only known venomous lizards in North America. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gila_monster

Those are 1" tiles so you can see its around 7-8". I used a dust pan and foxtail to relocate him outdoors. My fellow crew members screamed like little girls as I walked past them in the dayroom.
IMAG0212.jpg
I ran into this guy a few months ago while hiking with my son. It was much bigger.
IMG_0840.JPG IMG_0841.JPG
 

extropic

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#29
Since we're telling stories . . .
I was visiting friends in Tucson a few years ago and came across a spider in their house.
It was a light brown/tan color and about 2 - 2 1/2" diameter leg spread.
Not so exciting so far.
I turned away to find something to swat it with and when I turned back it was scampering across the hardwood floor.
The thing that startled me was that it clattered as it ran, as if it had hard tips on its legs.
I had never "heard" a spider like that before, or since.
By the way, it escaped. Went under a recliner and I couldn't find it.
I warned the family. No one seemed the least bit concerned.
I stayed away from that recliner for the rest of my visit.
 
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