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Craftsman Bench Drill Press – Make and year?

Discussion in 'ATLAS, CRAFTSMAN & AA' started by OhioMike, Mar 10, 2017.

  1. OhioMike

    OhioMike United States Iron Registered Member

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    I’m looking for any information (i.e. owner’s manual, model year, etc.) on this older cast body Craftsman drill press. This is the only photo I have, so this may be a challenge. Any approximation of age would help.

    Thanks in advance for your help,

    From Ohio - Mike

    Craftsman Bench Drill Press.jpeg
     
  2. brino

    brino Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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  3. wa5cab

    wa5cab Downloads Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    If it still has its nameplate, post the model number. That will (eventually) ID who made it.
     
  4. OhioMike

    OhioMike United States Iron Registered Member

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    Thank you,

    I will do that search. I am a new member and have yet to learn all of the features of this site. This drill press is kind of a barn find where a friend saw it and sent me the e mail photo. I 'think' it maybe a model 103, but haven't had my hands on it yet. I need a drill press with some heft and believe this may work if it is at all serviceable. Your (members) knowledge of the drill press history will get me over the learning curve quickly to avoid buying another piece of scrap iron.

    From Ohio - Mike
     
  5. wa5cab

    wa5cab Downloads Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Craftsman model numbers are three digits, a decimal point, and three, four or five digits. Like the Craftsman 12" lathe equivalent to the Atlas 10D is 101.07381.
     
  6. BrianT

    BrianT United States Steel Registered Member

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    I do believe it is a "103" A fine drill press depending on your needs. Im thinking the one in the pics does not have the low speed pulley based on the pics, if not the speeds will generally be higher than needed for metal work. I have one and that is what I have found, Im going to a 90vdc conversion eventually to get the speeds I need for metals.
     
  7. OhioMike

    OhioMike United States Iron Registered Member

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    Thanks for your reply to this post.

    You make a good point about spindle speed. According to most information I have found, the slowest speed for the original motor (1750 RPM) and pulley arrangements is 610 RPM? Were they kind of all like that? The chuck sizes I have seen in older user 103 manuals are 1/2". So I should be able to poke holes 1/2" holes in mild steel with that setup? But things change, so, what is your suggestion for changes to bring the RPM down - Variable speed motor or pulley changes - can you provide details or direction to where I may find that on H-M?

    From Ohio - Mike
     
  8. brino

    brino Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Hi Mike,

    By my math, 610 RPM is ideal for drilling a 1/2" hole in mild steel with a HSS drill bit (80 sfpm).
    For smaller diameters you want higher RPM for same SFPM.

    There are a few good ways to slow down a drill press.

    Here's a couple threads on adding another pulley:
    http://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/gearing-down-a-jet-drill.42251/
    http://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/slowing-down-my-drill-press.33007/

    Here's a thread on slowing a wood cutting band-saw down for metal work by converting it to a variable speed DC drive treadmill motor:
    http://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/wood-to-metal-bandsaw-coversion-made-easy.12386/#post100184

    Here's one on replacing a band-saw motor with a 3-phase and using a VFD (variable frequency drive) for speed control:
    http://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/converting-a-wood-bandsaw-to-cut-steel.22593/

    -brino
     
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  9. OhioMike

    OhioMike United States Iron Registered Member

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    Thanks for the quick reply,

    Yep, your math is excellent. This time of year I use 'fuzzy' math - tax season you know.

    I will investigate the links to those threads.

    I have yet to see this drill press, but hope to get a look next week. It looks to have been painted that standard machine shop green - speed and pulley tables included. Not original by any means. Any known historical issues I should need to look for that would make me pass on the buy?
    Another 'new to the 103' question - Are there other chuck sizes available - like can I find a 1" chuck for this old 103 - would it be capable of turning one if converted?

    From Ohio - Mike
     
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  10. wa5cab

    wa5cab Downloads Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I don't know the answer to your first question (known historical issues). As to a 1" capacity chuck, the 1961 Jacobs catalog only shows the ball bearing 20N, and it takes a 5JT arbor and would probably cost more than the drill press. 1" shank drills are also going to be scarce and expensive. Do you know yet what the spindle nose is? The choices are probably either 3/8"-24, 1/2"-24 or 1/2"-20. The largest 1/2" threaded mount chucks that Jacobs made are 0-1/2" capacity. Which is most likely what's on the machine already. If the spindle is #2MT, which is less likely, then yes, drills were made up to 1" dia. with 2MT shanks. However, the drill press is too fast for mild steel much above 1/2" dia.

    The machine that you are looking at is a 4-speed. If you need a drill press for general machine shop use, I would recommend that you look for a 12-speed with either 2MT or 3MT spindle (AKA quill).
     
  11. markba633csi

    markba633csi United States Active Member Active Member

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    You really want to be around 220-350 rpm for drilling larger holes in steel. You'll burn and dull drill bits more quickly if too fast.
    Mark S.
     
  12. OhioMike

    OhioMike United States Iron Registered Member

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    Well, that was a brain dead moment on my part. Of course the 103 isn’t a tapered spindle.

    Although this is still all in the planning, I see a need to drill larger holes ¾” in Durlon or phenolic material. So maybe I can neck a drill shank down to ½” and get by.

    I think the 103 is priced right even in fair shape and part of this exercise is staying in budget.

    As a newly retired guy, cash flow is king.

    Thanks for your help and guiding hand,

    From Ohio - Mike
     
  13. wa5cab

    wa5cab Downloads Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    OK. Then what you need to start looking for are (although they may be made by many different vendors) are Silver and Deming bits (after the name of the company that first made them). By default, they are all the same length as a jobber length 1/2" bit. All have either 1/2" dia. shanks, or that plus three flats ground on the shank so that they will not slip. Some are available from 33/64" to 1-1/2" in 1/64th increments. Less expensive sets have only 1/32" or 1/16" increments. Or if you only need say 3/4", you can buy just that.
     
  14. OhioMike

    OhioMike United States Iron Registered Member

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    The bench drill press is Craftsman 103.23131. What I found in the archive is a model year of 1955. It is younger than I am, but not by much. It runs well and looks to have all of the original parts. The table has several ‘oops-darn it’ drill divots. If you were to price the 103 by the pound, I think I did okay on the purchase. That doesn’t include the cost of the visit to the chiropractic to relieve the back strain from loading the thing in my truck.

    I have also found a reference document for a ‘multi-speed attachment’ that I’m sure you all have knowledge of. The set of pulleys mid-way between the motor and spindle provides wider range of speeds with a lower low and higher high RPM. This drill does not have that, but it may be an option. My initial search found several online, albeit pricey. I’m not in any desperate need, buy I would like your feedback on that option if you have any.

    This drill will work fine 'as is' for what I need for now.

    I appreciate your assistance and thanks again,

    From Ohio - Mike
     
  15. brino

    brino Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Hopefully you're still running under original parts too!

    Really that option is like my two links above to threads on adding a pulley. It does not need to be expensive. There's a bearing (or two) inside the new step pulley, a crank arm, and two short belts. A nice little project, and if you buy link belts you can be a little sloppy in the measurements too.

    -brino
     

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