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Cleaning old Bridgeport thats really oily

Discussion in 'GENERAL DISCUSSIONS' started by bobdog, Apr 13, 2017.

  1. bobdog

    bobdog United States Grandson Lil Rebel Minibike Registered Member

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    I have a old bridgeport that has alot of old oil on it. From years being in old machine shop. Would like to clean it up without stripping paint . What has anybody used to clean theres but without water ? Need ideas Thanks
     
  2. JimDawson

    JimDawson Global Moderator Staff Member Director

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    Mineral spirits (paint thinner), from your local hardware store.
     
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  3. ELHEAD

    ELHEAD United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Kerosene. Smells more than mineral spirits, but cheaper and as effective.
     
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  4. Alan H

    Alan H United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Simple Green PRO HD followed by WD40. The PRO HD is good for metal. The WD40 is the final step.

    I did an Enco a year ago. It was amazing how it looked after a serious cleaning. It belongs to my son and is used in his business. It looks great today.

    upload_2017-4-13_22-38-53.png
     
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  5. darkzero

    darkzero Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    If it's just oily WD40 would work fine. If it's caked on grime like Alan recommended, I'd use a degreaser first, then WD40. But pay attention to which degreaser you use. Some degreasers like Purple Power or Zep Purple can remove paint at full strength.
     
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  6. Alan H

    Alan H United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Will's caution on degreasers is good one.

    I personally would not use Purple Power or similar products since they have sodium hydroxide (caustic) in them. I keep it on the shelf and use it from time to time but not on good machine tools.

    If the safety data sheet cautions against storage in copper, aluminum and the likes, that means it is corrosive. While the concentrations of the bad actors are low, they are still strong enough to burn you and corrode some components of a machine tool. The stuff is also hard on your lungs. So if you do use it, use it outside not in a confined space like a shop without good ventilation.

    Here is a snippet of what is in Purple Power:
    upload_2017-4-14_5-54-47.png
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2017
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  7. tq60

    tq60 United States Active Member Active Member

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    Ww discovered greased lightening at lowes and it is magic.

    9 bucks a gallon or 26 for 5 so get the 5 gallon and use full strength.

    Put in a garden sprayer.

    Get a second garden sprayer and mix a strong batch of dawn to use for rinsing agent.

    Spray GL on first and let it soak, scrap with heavy brush then rinse with dawn...repeat



    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337Z using Tapatalk
     
  8. Alan H

    Alan H United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I'd be mighty leery of spraying any of my machine tools with water as a rinse. IMO WD40 is a much better final treatment and you buy it by the gallon at the big box store or even cheaper via Amazon Prime.
     
  9. 4gsr

    4gsr Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Here lately I've been using the purple stuff cut by 75% with water. Put in one of the disposable bottles sold in packs of five I believe. Squirt it on small areas at a time scrub with one of them HF 2-3" wide paint brushes, then rinse off with water in another spray bottle. Let dry. If I'm cleaning bare metal surfaces, do the same but take paper shop towels wipe dry followed by Starrett M-1. I banned WD-40 for rust issues in my shop. Later I coat with machine or way oil. I do not allow soap or water get near slides where it can get up between the surfaces. The only time the purple soap has been a problem is on poorly painted surfaces. It will lift the first coat off. Most of the time that is fine with me because I generally prepare the surfaces and re paint.

    BTW- All good answers above including if you want to use WD-40, too.

    KEn
     
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  10. machinejack

    machinejack United States Iron Registered Member

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    I use "Awesome" cleaner full strength. You need to watch it as it can discolor the paint if left on to long. Mixed with hot water its not as harsh. Cheap at Dollar stores, Freds, etc. You need to get some protection on after it dries, it takes it all off. Personally I don't like WD-40 it leaves a film on and over time on stored tools left in the open there will be dust caked on that is hard to remove so you are at square one again cleaning. A light wiping with a good non automotive oil is best.
    IMHO
    Jack
     
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  11. Alan H

    Alan H United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Agreed, I use WD40 as the final step cleaner not the protectant. It is full of surfactants/detergents and also displaces any water that the primary cleaner had in it.

    After cleaning all machine tools deserve a protectant and/or lubricating film on them - way oil, spindle oil, grease, Boeshield, Corrosion X, Glide Coat, . . . . .
     
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  12. EmilioG

    EmilioG United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Oil Eater and Purple Power is what I use for oily greasy parts and tools. Awesome cleaning power and they don't affect the metal.
     
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  13. gi_984

    gi_984 Active User Active Member

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    I tried a variety of the degreasers, but always go back to kerosene. It takes a bit longer than your whiz bang brand name degreasers on the heavy caked on stuff BUT zero issues with letting kerosene soak. Price is right and no risk of rusting. A little goes a long way and is reusable. I use a small concrete mixing tub (rectangular) and several cheap plastic cat litter boxes to sit big parts in and catch run off. An assortment of fine steel wool, paint brushes, old toothbrushes and you're in business.
     
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  14. Old junk

    Old junk United States Active Member Active Member

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    Kero here too use it at my auto shop also,it's all we use for last 30+years.
     
  15. benmychree

    benmychree United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I have never used anything as good as Oil Eater; I use it full strength for heavy crud and diluted for a dipping solution.
     

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