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Cleaning New Pm932..how Far To Go?

Discussion in 'PRECISION-MATTHEWS' started by Hozzie, Nov 14, 2016.

  1. Hozzie

    Hozzie Belgium H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    So I received my PM932 (non-pdf) last week and I moved it into my shop this weekend. I am waiting on my larger base to be welded up (the PM base will sit on it) so I can add leveling feet so while I am waiting I figured I would go ahead and clean up the mill.

    I started by simply scraping some of the cosmoline off and using WD-40 to wipe things down. I have read where some people have basically taken it all apart to clean it. I am new to Mills and while I am very handy, completely breaking down my table, etc to clean it is a bit intimidating. Is there any somewhat step by step instructions on doing such a thing? I did a search here and didn't really see anything. The manual shows an exploded parts view, but I was hoping for something a bit more direct.

    I read the thread on the PM727 and figure it is similar, but also figured it can't hurt to ask. Worst case, I will just clean up everything I can reach for now and see how it goes, but I also understand that these can be pretty gritty from the factory.

    Is it really a must do to tear it down in most people's opinion?
     
  2. jbolt

    jbolt United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I ran mine for a couple of months before I tore it down to do the CNC conversion. Overall it was pretty clean except there was some grit in the head. I would at the very least pull the top off the head at the first oil change and check it out.
     
  3. wrmiller

    wrmiller Chief Tinkerer H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I would suggest you take it as far as you are comfortable with, and try it that way. These things can be a bit intimidating at first. :)

    The critical areas IMO are the sliding and turning parts. The screws need to be cleaned as best you can and oiled. The sliding surfaces also. I would suggest pulling the gibbs and cleaning them as well as cleaning the areas they sit in as best you can. You have to adjust them anyways... :)
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2016
  4. Hozzie

    Hozzie Belgium H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Thanks. I am not really afraid to take it apart, but also am not one to take things apart, just to take them apart (mostly). I will take a bit closer look and if it doesn't seem too bad to take apart, I may just go ahead and do it to know that it is clean. I am also the type that likes to know exactly what I am dealing with when it comes to condition of my tools, so it is a balancing act.
     
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  5. tomh

    tomh Active Member Active Member

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    I personally feel that you should just wipe it down and use it, let it seat /wear in for a few months, learning the machine and its quirks then take it apart if you feel the need.
     
  6. Hozzie

    Hozzie Belgium H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I went ahead and took the table, etc apart, cleaned it, lubed it, and put it back together. Probably took me 3 hours just taking my time. It wasn't bad at all as far as any major grit, but the oil was really gummy. I am sure it would have been fine, but I am glad I took it apart and got everything really clean. I also went ahead and honed the gibs while they were out.

    Some pics in case anyone wondered what it looked like from the factory.
    i-nz2kX26-X2.jpg
    i-LP3wBBg-X3.jpg
    i-7pTsR5X-X3.jpg
    i-z3fWRMJ-X3.jpg

    And back together.
    i-6WPtmXr-X3.jpg
     

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  7. Alan H

    Alan H United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Thanks for the photos, I did wonder what it looked like.
     
  8. BFHammer

    BFHammer United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Hozzie,

    Thanks for posting that. I know I'm pulling up a bit of an old thread but it's very helpful. I'm getting ready to purchase my first mill also a PM-932 from QMT. I'm also purchasing a lathe assuming I can make up my mind between the 1228 and the 1236. Did you get or do you have a lathe from PM too?

    Also wanted to say hey as you are the closest HM neighbor I have spotted so far. I live in Chattanooga.

    Mark
     
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  9. T Bredehoft

    T Bredehoft Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I wimped out on cleaning my PM25 when I got it, I wiped all the ways that could be reached, ditto lead screws. The Y screw was pretty well concealed so it didn't get enough cleaning. I'm to the point now where it stutters when being cranked slowly, jumping several tenths. I attribute this to the packing/protecting (cosmolene?) that I didn't remove when I received it. I'm looking now for a window of time when I can tear it down to clean the Y surfaces.
    I, too, recommend this before starting.
     
  10. Hozzie

    Hozzie Belgium H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Hey Mark,

    Just saw this so you may have done something already, but I had a SB Heavy 10 when I bought my mill, but I literally just upgraded to a PM 1440GS. It should be in this week. I've been happy with my 932 so far. I feel like Matt offers a good value product.

    Hopefully your making some chips by now.
     
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  11. BFHammer

    BFHammer United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Hozzie,

    Thanks - I ended up going with the 1236 and haven't regretted it. Just got my DRO installed last week but been making some chips along the way. Now with the DRO installed I will be moving it into its final location in the shop this weekend.

    I have also been happy with the 932 - it's my first mill but i think it will work great for me.

    Congratulations on the 1440! I'm sure you will be love it.
     
  12. LarsP

    LarsP United States Iron Registered Member

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    Your pictures make an excellent argument for at least taking the table and saddle off.

    L
     

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