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[4]

Cleaning New Pm932..how Far To Go?

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Hozzie

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#1
So I received my PM932 (non-pdf) last week and I moved it into my shop this weekend. I am waiting on my larger base to be welded up (the PM base will sit on it) so I can add leveling feet so while I am waiting I figured I would go ahead and clean up the mill.

I started by simply scraping some of the cosmoline off and using WD-40 to wipe things down. I have read where some people have basically taken it all apart to clean it. I am new to Mills and while I am very handy, completely breaking down my table, etc to clean it is a bit intimidating. Is there any somewhat step by step instructions on doing such a thing? I did a search here and didn't really see anything. The manual shows an exploded parts view, but I was hoping for something a bit more direct.

I read the thread on the PM727 and figure it is similar, but also figured it can't hurt to ask. Worst case, I will just clean up everything I can reach for now and see how it goes, but I also understand that these can be pretty gritty from the factory.

Is it really a must do to tear it down in most people's opinion?
 

jbolt

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#2
I ran mine for a couple of months before I tore it down to do the CNC conversion. Overall it was pretty clean except there was some grit in the head. I would at the very least pull the top off the head at the first oil change and check it out.
 

wrmiller

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#3
I would suggest you take it as far as you are comfortable with, and try it that way. These things can be a bit intimidating at first. :)

The critical areas IMO are the sliding and turning parts. The screws need to be cleaned as best you can and oiled. The sliding surfaces also. I would suggest pulling the gibbs and cleaning them as well as cleaning the areas they sit in as best you can. You have to adjust them anyways... :)
 
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Hozzie

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#4
Thanks. I am not really afraid to take it apart, but also am not one to take things apart, just to take them apart (mostly). I will take a bit closer look and if it doesn't seem too bad to take apart, I may just go ahead and do it to know that it is clean. I am also the type that likes to know exactly what I am dealing with when it comes to condition of my tools, so it is a balancing act.
 

tomh

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#5
I personally feel that you should just wipe it down and use it, let it seat /wear in for a few months, learning the machine and its quirks then take it apart if you feel the need.
 

Hozzie

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#6
I went ahead and took the table, etc apart, cleaned it, lubed it, and put it back together. Probably took me 3 hours just taking my time. It wasn't bad at all as far as any major grit, but the oil was really gummy. I am sure it would have been fine, but I am glad I took it apart and got everything really clean. I also went ahead and honed the gibs while they were out.

Some pics in case anyone wondered what it looked like from the factory.
i-nz2kX26-X2.jpg
i-LP3wBBg-X3.jpg
i-7pTsR5X-X3.jpg
i-z3fWRMJ-X3.jpg

And back together.
i-6WPtmXr-X3.jpg
 

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Alan H

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#7
Thanks for the photos, I did wonder what it looked like.
 

BFHammer

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#8
Hozzie,

Thanks for posting that. I know I'm pulling up a bit of an old thread but it's very helpful. I'm getting ready to purchase my first mill also a PM-932 from QMT. I'm also purchasing a lathe assuming I can make up my mind between the 1228 and the 1236. Did you get or do you have a lathe from PM too?

Also wanted to say hey as you are the closest HM neighbor I have spotted so far. I live in Chattanooga.

Mark
 

T Bredehoft

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#9
I wimped out on cleaning my PM25 when I got it, I wiped all the ways that could be reached, ditto lead screws. The Y screw was pretty well concealed so it didn't get enough cleaning. I'm to the point now where it stutters when being cranked slowly, jumping several tenths. I attribute this to the packing/protecting (cosmolene?) that I didn't remove when I received it. I'm looking now for a window of time when I can tear it down to clean the Y surfaces.
I, too, recommend this before starting.
 

Hozzie

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#10
Hozzie,

Thanks for posting that. I know I'm pulling up a bit of an old thread but it's very helpful. I'm getting ready to purchase my first mill also a PM-932 from QMT. I'm also purchasing a lathe assuming I can make up my mind between the 1228 and the 1236. Did you get or do you have a lathe from PM too?

Also wanted to say hey as you are the closest HM neighbor I have spotted so far. I live in Chattanooga.

Mark
Hey Mark,

Just saw this so you may have done something already, but I had a SB Heavy 10 when I bought my mill, but I literally just upgraded to a PM 1440GS. It should be in this week. I've been happy with my 932 so far. I feel like Matt offers a good value product.

Hopefully your making some chips by now.
 

BFHammer

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#11
Hozzie,

Thanks - I ended up going with the 1236 and haven't regretted it. Just got my DRO installed last week but been making some chips along the way. Now with the DRO installed I will be moving it into its final location in the shop this weekend.

I have also been happy with the 932 - it's my first mill but i think it will work great for me.

Congratulations on the 1440! I'm sure you will be love it.
 

LarsP

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#12
Your pictures make an excellent argument for at least taking the table and saddle off.

L
 

Railin93

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#13
Just got a 932 and ive been seriously dreading taking this thing apart to clean it...im pretty mechanically inclined so no issue with that part but still, its an expensive piece of equipment i dont want to render useless before i even get to...your pics help clear some of the air as to what id be looking at when the time comes (or i ever get a day off work)...
 

wrmiller

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#14
Just got a 932 and ive been seriously dreading taking this thing apart to clean it...im pretty mechanically inclined so no issue with that part but still, its an expensive piece of equipment i dont want to render useless before i even get to...your pics help clear some of the air as to what id be looking at when the time comes (or i ever get a day off work)...
I have not owned a 932, but I had a similar mill (9x40) from a different vendor.

After having owned several machine tools that were built in China, I am now of the opinion that anyone who is capable of even a minor tear-down before putting the machine into service will end up with a much more satisfying experience with their new toy. In the case of a medium-sized bench mill I would suggest taking the table and saddle off at the very least. And clean, inspect, and deburr/stone anything suspect. This would include all bearing surfaces, leadscrews, gibbs, and acme nuts. I even cleaned the bearings for the leadscrews and put a better quality oil in them. Check your gibbs for flatness and stone them to remove any burrs and/or rough surfaces on the face that slides against the table or saddle.

For those who are crazy like me, you can even stone the edges of the leadscrews to help prevent them from cutting or damaging the acme nuts.

I would not suggest taking the head and z-axis saddle off unless you know what you are doing and/or have someone who can help. On mine I just kept putting oil on the top of the saddle and running the head up and down until the oil coming out the bottom was clean.

Enjoy your new toy...err...mill. :)
 

BogusSVO

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#15
This looks to be my project for today, cleaning the PM932... Thanks for the pics!

My main question is, once clean, what should I lube the lead screws and other moving parts with?

I was thinking of maybe anti-seize, Zink or copper? or even cam break in paste "Molybdenum Disulfide"

I was thinking a paste would be better since it would stay in place for the long term, when compared to a gel or an oil.
 

Hozzie

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#16
This looks to be my project for today, cleaning the PM932... Thanks for the pics!

My main question is, once clean, what should I lube the lead screws and other moving parts with?

I was thinking of maybe anti-seize, Zink or copper? or even cam break in paste "Molybdenum Disulfide"

I was thinking a paste would be better since it would stay in place for the long term, when compared to a gel or an oil.
I think I used Mobil 1 Synthetic Grease on mine for the screw. Ways of course got way oil.
 

BogusSVO

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#17
I use good old turtle wax paste on all my ways and air float tables on my other equipment, then use as little oil as possible, I have found this keeps rust at bay in this humid area, and will not catch as much air borne grit.
 

Bob Korves

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#18
I think I used Mobil 1 Synthetic Grease on mine for the screw. Ways of course got way oil.
Grease is not a good idea on exposed parts. Grease will catch and hold chips and grit, which will wear the parts quickly and badly.
 
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