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Checking out an old hacksaw

burtonbr

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#1
Noticed this in a local auction listing for this weekend. I've always wanted a power hacksaw but really don't have the space for one. Might just have to have this one unless it goes for some ridiculous price. Looks like it might need some work and cleaning up but seems pretty complete, I'd like to have it and get it cutting either way.

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Cactus Farmer

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#2
I have a larger power hack saw and it is slow but it will make incredible straight cuts. I needed some discs about 3-4 inches in diameter, put a bar of unknown steel and sliced off a squaring cut. Bumped it over after a slight loosening of the vise. Third cut and there is my disc, almost perfect parallel faces. I cut 3 more just for fun! You never know when you will need a disc for a hot government project.
It uses 17 or 18" blades with tooth counts from 14 to 3 teeth per inch. Very easy to swap blades.
The 3-6 TPI blades for thick cuts, the chips look like part off cuttings. There is almost always the need for cooling fluid of some sort. And don't catch the chips like the fellow who saw me testing the saw with a coarse 3 TPI blade. The chips were falling into the chip pan and making small puffs of smoke. He caught some before than I stop him! It didn't take him long to look at them! Small white cooked spots and as this saw had a speed control I was running as slow as possible. Be sure on flame cut material that you grind thru and hardened areas or your blade will be destroyed. I think your saw will be using regular hack saw blades. Buy the best bi-metal blade you can get. They will last for a long time. Since power hacks are no longer in vogue they often have clearance sales on blades. Keep you eyes open for these sales.
When a blade becomes dull or gets all the teeth on one side ruined you still have some good material for knifes, scrapers or other tools.
I hope it becomes yours, they are great tools.
 
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Silverbullet

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#3
Looks like it's complete and being craftsman there should be manuals around even parts. Couple sellers on eBay have good prices on blades. If ya get it and need more info on blades just holler.
 

DaveInMi

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#4
I have one of those. I paid $5.00 for it at an estate auction. It uses regular hacksaw blades. I use it for mystery metals because it doesn't cost much if I ruin a blade. It doesn't take up much space either.
 

Scruffy

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#6
It's a covel sold as a craftsman. Made in new haven mi. If I r ember right. I have one and use it all the time
Thanks scruffy
 

Charles Spencer

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#7
I have one of those and I like it a lot. It's fun to watch it work. I use regular Lennox blades on mine. I changed the setup and mounted the motor underneath to save space.

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Ken from ontario

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#8
what a neat lookin tool, there was machine shop near us that had one just like it but the owner never used it for production, he said it was way too slow to cut but loads of fun to watch it in action.
 

woodchucker

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#9
I have a nice small benchtop unit. I had to make a new arm for it, as someone bent the arm under too much tension.
Mine does not cut straight, but that's because the arm being replaced, and it not being cast.
I still use it , it does cut slow, but if you keep adding cutting fluid it does go quicker.
 

burtonbr

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#10
Great info, thanks guys. Cool to see some still being used, I've never seen one in person but always fascinated by the videos I've seen of them.

Looking at the pictures of this one it would suit me better to have the motor mounted underneath too.
 

LeakyCanoe

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#11
Another variation...mine is on a home-built wooden A-frame stand for stability with a gravity tensioned belt courtesy of a hinged motor baseplate. It's heavy but moveable around the shop and has a minimal footprint. The design is robust enough to take up the inherent movement of the machine as it does its' thing. I rather enjoy using it, and I've lost count of how many cuts I have made just to show it off . :geek:


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Chipper5783

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#12
Cactus (above) has some good comments. I too have a larger power hacksaw - only a 14" blade, but as per Cactus, I run a 3 tpi blade, the slowest speed (6 speed machine) and it really seems to benefit from coolant. This particular machine (the smallest of the Kasto PSB machines) has a hydraulic feed that applies considerable downward force. The blade is much more robust than a regular hacksaw blade (.075 thick and 1.5" wide) - for thick sections and tough material it does a good job (i.e. cuts rail road rail very nicely). All that said, it is still sort of a novelty machine

The little saw at the auction? Sure, it will still be sort of a novelty - but I have no doubt it would clean up and do a great job for you (so much cheaper on blades and really not much longer in cutting time - for hundreds of cuts per day speed may matter, but so what in a hobby or maintenance type shop).
 

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terrywerm

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#13
I have to admit that I love power hacksaws. Like shapers, they have a rather mesmerizing effect as you watch them go about their business, going to and fro. I have a Keller Hy-Duty 5A, which is a larger saw, it will cut anything that I would ever need to do. The problem with it is that it is so doggone big and heavy, relegating it to the garage, it will never get into my basement shop. I had always thought that I would like to find a smaller one like the Covel that would be easy to move around for my basement shop, it would be great for cutting smaller pieces of stock, etc.

Anyway, to get back on track here, I think you will like that saw, especially if you take the time to clean her up and breath some new life into her. Go for it!
 

terrywerm

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#15
At $30 for the pair I think you did just fine. I'd have given $30 just for the saw.
 

burtonbr

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#16
Yea it was a great deal, couldn't believe nobody wanted either. I would have paid 100 probably a little more..
 

Charles Spencer

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#18
I just have to say :congrats: but it still needs a :you suck:
Yep. I had refrained from telling you that I paid $25 for my hacksaw because I didn't want to sound like I was gloating. So I guess you got the drill press for $5.25.
 
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burtonbr

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#20
Ya'all are going to get tired of seeing this saw, but a few more pics and I'll stop. I modified the stand today with new legs and got the motor mounted underneath where it should be. Then ran it for about an hr cutting scrap to see if it will hold up before I take it off to paint the stand then I'm going yo call it done, oh except for putting some wheels on one end so I can move it easier, it's getting heavy.

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Charles Spencer

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#22
You might want to check each oil port and see what the oil inside looks like. I usually dip in a pipe cleaner. I'm thinking you might want to remove the old oil with a siphon or syringe and replace it. I copied this from the manual because there are so many oil ports.

LUBRICATION

Lubricate regularly by putting 3 to 4 drops of SAE 30 oil into each of the seven oil holes. Locations are:

One on the lifting arm.
Three on the saw head.
Two on the main slide.
One on the main raising lever.
 
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Silverbullet

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#23
YUPP it's more important to keep the working parts lubed then shiny. Oilers need oil daily when used. Congrats nice machines.
 

DaveInMi

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#24
You might want to check each oil port and see what the oil inside looks like. I usually dip in a pipe cleaner. I'm thinking you might want to remove the old oil with a siphon or syringe and replace it. I copied this from the manual because there are so many oil ports.

LUBRICATION

Lubricate regularly by putting 3 to 4 drops of SAE 30 oil into each of the seven oil holes. Locations are:

One on the lifting arm.
Three on the saw head.
Two on the main slide.
One on the main raising lever.
And one inside a hole in the crank wheel. You have to turn the crank wheel to find it.
 
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