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Carbide Tipped Lathe Center

rwm

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#1
I wanted to buy a carbide tipped lathe center when I was struck by inspiration!

I already have several of these carbide drills bought at auction:



The MT2 shank is steel with a carbide drill brazed on. I figured if if I could cut most of the drill off I could grind the remainder in to a carbide center. I tried to cut it with an angle grinder...HA! No chance. But carbides strength is its weakness. I was able to easily break the drill off with a hammer. I chipped it down to about 3/4" long.
Then I put it into my lathe and attacked it with my shop made tool post grinder.

Here is the rough fractured end being ground by a Chinese diamond wheel.



Some progress:



Finished:





The grinding took about an hour to remove all that carbide but it came out well!

I had another thought: If you have an old fractured carbide drill etc. and you have an old worn out drill or reamer that fits your tailstock, you could drill a hole in the latter and braze in the former. Then grind the component into a nice carbide center!

Robert
 
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RandyM

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#2
Isn't great to make your own tooling. Nice job!
 

RandyM

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#4
It is great! Usually I use $21 to make a $20 tool and I still enjoy it.
R
Yeah, and not to mention the consumption of your time.

But hey, that is why it is our hobby. Hobbies are not meant to be justified financially, it is all about a psychological well being.
 

rwm

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#5
And the learning process. Still coughing from the carbide dust. I have learned to turn on the dust collection next time!
R
 

rwm

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#7
I read about tungsten poisoning. Pretty rare actually. I thought this was really cool:

Acute poisoning-"This is an extremely rare presentation. Much of the information on human toxicity comes from case reports of a purported acute toxic reaction to tungsten dissolved in alcoholic drinks following a tradition of French army artillery recruits drinking wine/beer which had rinsed a recently fired gun barrel. Introduction of tungsten into the alloy of the barrel was thought to be the cause of this novel poisoning event."

Bottom line- don't rinse your rifle barrels in wine and then drink it!
Robert
 

wildo

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#8
What is the advantage of a carbide center vs standard tool steel?
 

darkzero

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#9
What is the advantage of a carbide center vs standard tool steel?
Less wear and won't gall or get damaged as easy as a steel dead center especially if you are spinning a part on the dead center like in the old days.

I use high pressure center lube with my centers. Ever since I started using it I've noticed I don't get marks or scoring on my centers like I sometimes used to in the past.
 

Desolus

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#10
I read about tungsten poisoning. Pretty rare actually. I thought this was really cool:

Acute poisoning-"This is an extremely rare presentation. Much of the information on human toxicity comes from case reports of a purported acute toxic reaction to tungsten dissolved in alcoholic drinks following a tradition of French army artillery recruits drinking wine/beer which had rinsed a recently fired gun barrel. Introduction of tungsten into the alloy of the barrel was thought to be the cause of this novel poisoning event."

Bottom line- don't rinse your rifle barrels in wine and then drink it!
Robert
Oh I'm POSITIVE it was the small ammount of tungsten alloyed with the barrel and not anything else... lol
 

Silverbullet

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#11
From the pictures I see here and on many others using grinders on there lathes , they don't worry about the debree from grinding getting into the ways and becoming lapping compound wearing the metal down. Is it me that's just to careful or am I wrong , I was always taught to protect from grinding dust and sanding debree . Maybe they wash down I don't know but I cringe seeing it done. Then they wonder why ,, my LATHES not cutting right.
 

Desolus

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#12
As a stone cutter I share the sentiment, but it's not exactly an irreversible condition, the machine can be cleaned easily before any wear of note happens.
 

Ulma Doctor

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#13
I read about tungsten poisoning. Pretty rare actually. I thought this was really cool:
Bottom line- don't rinse your rifle barrels in wine and then drink it!
Robert
Note to self...
Do Not drink the juice poured from a howitzer barrel! :beer:


Nice work Robert on the center, looks great!:)
 

rwm

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#14
That is a good point about the grinding dust on the lathe ways. I usually cover all the ways with a rag for protection. I have not found a good way to keep dust out of the chuck. I just blow it off when finished.
I am gratified that people found the Tungsten poisoning event as interesting as I did!
Robert
 
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