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Buying a lathe, what tooling should I get/avoid?

ttabbal

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#1
I know there are some similar posts, but I hope you guys will offer suggestions anyway. I have been searching and reading, but getting a little bogged down in it...

I have a pretty hard budget of $3000, including shipping. Items have to be available to purchase from a normal web store. EBay etc is going to cause problems as it's not me doing the actual ordering. I need to be able to supply a simple web link and basic info so they can put in a card and order. The lathe, stand, and shipping come to about $2500. I don't need the best quality, but better than Harbor Freight.

Lathe is PM 1022V/1030V (depending on how long it takes for 1030s to come in)

I know I want a tailstock drill chuck, I'll probably order that from PM with the machine.

PM has some holder and insert sets that look nice. Grizzly has something similar that includes a cutoff/groove tool. I do want to be able to cut slots for snap-rings and o-rings eventually. And parting off is needed.
 

T Bredehoft

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#3
I agree with Mark, when you find you need something. you can generally get it within 2 days from somewhere on the internet.
Or, we can tell you of about $1500 worth of stuff you might need somewhere down the road.

One thought, If Matt offers a live center for the tailstock, get it.

While I don't have a PM lathe, I do have one of Matt's mills, and find it eminently satisfactory. His customer service is top notch.
 

Asm109

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#4
Items for the lathe that I could not live without.
Jacobs chuck for tailstock
live center for tail stock
Quick change toolpost and tool holders for following tools
Turning
Facing
Boring
parting
Knurling

3jaw and 4 jaw chucks.
I use Hss tooling and grind my own bits.
 

kvt

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#5
like most have said, depends on what your are trying to make. and do like me add as you need and find it on ebay and sales.
I'm on a tight limit for getting some tooling etc, so it is come as I can. Also I purchase some stuff cheap HF, then upgrade as I get a chance.
you did not say if it could be a bunch of sites or if it needed to be one or a few. Also do you have any stuff already. Mics, Calipers etc.

for the lathe itself.
A live center is a must
The chuck for the tailstock
Set of center drills and drill bits. I have found the little stubby ones are better on my 10x24.
QCTP is grate and makes things go a hole lot smoother or at least for me.
Extra Holders, can be found many places for AXA style for as low as 10 to 12 plus shipping, occasionally also free shipping. Compare prices
If you have a good grinder HSS tooling as you can grind your own. Again deals can be found on web/ebay
3 and 4 jaw chucks for the lathe normally get initial with the lathe
If it does not have the quick change gear box then a full set of change gears
THe list can be endless, but can be managed based on what you have, and what you are wanting to start doing.
 

Z2V

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#6
If you order from PM get as much as you can of your list at the same time. It will all be included in the box with the machine, no extra shipping charge. The drill chuck shown with that lathe has been a very nice chuck for the price. Don't forget to add extra tool holders while your at it.
 

richl

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#7
Drill chuck for the tailstock, while many of the tools you will get from Matt are great, I bought one of his more affordable mt3 keyless chucks... not so good. I ended up getting a nice one from glacern https://www.glacern.com/drill_chucks, more affordable than Matt's high precision models and very smooth, and mine is very good, very low runout. You save a few bucks for others things, a win-win.

Rich
 

Glenn Brooks

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#8
Above all else you will need a decent dial indicator and magnetic base to hold the work properly in your chuck. plus a set of micrometers to accurately measure diameter of your work. Maybe 0-1", 1-2", and 2-3" to start with.

Sometimes people don't think of these as tooling, but you can't do much on a lathe without these items.

Also maybe look for a bunch of HSS 3/8 or 1/2" used lathe bits. I have purchased a package of 20 or more used cutters for a few bucks on eBay and usually find half or more can be reused and re ground many times in my shop - at great savings over cost of new.

I shop around a lot for used tooling on eBay - often finding great deals on decent quality tools. Just be cautious

Glenn
 

mikey

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#9
In my opinion, I would suggest you save a little more and buy the PM1127VF-LB. Before someone flames me, let me tell you why.

The 1127 has:
  • a D1-4 camlock spindle so any D1-4 chuck will fit. Not so with the 3 stud/lock ring affair; very limiting.
  • a 1.5" bore vs a 1" bore. This is a huge advantage when working with longer stock.
  • power feed is with a feed shaft instead of the lead screw. Think wear and tear.
  • a bed width of 7" vs 5.3". This has a big impact on the rigidity and accuracy of the lathe.
  • hardened, ground and balanced spindle on precision bearings - big plus.
You may think that you'll use the 1030 and upgrade later but if you begin with a decent lathe then the need to upgrade may not be necessary. Yeah, it costs almost $1000.00 more but, to me, it is worth saving a little longer and getting a much better built lathe. The 1127 is the lowest model lathe I would personally even consider in the PM line - you get a LOT of lathe for your buck.
 

Z2V

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#10
Mike made good points. The 1127 would max your current budget, but you could get the machine then start accumulating tooling as go. Worth strong consideration. I have a MT3 drill chuck I can loan you to get you going.
 

ttabbal

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#11
Well, I have a few calipers, dial and digital. I also have a couple Starett micrometers. I do have a HF mag base and dial indicator. I have no idea how accurate that is.. Are there some good brands/vendors for those?

I'm planning on getting HSS blanks and/or used bits to grind. I made some models from keystock (thanks mikey!) that went well.

It can be a few websites. It is a gift from my employer, thus the budget and source restrictions. I don't want to make it difficult for them to order.

Now, I have to admit that the 1127 does look like a nice machine. And I could toss in the extra cash for the shipping cost. I would have to source some tooling though. At least a few HSS blanks to grind on. I can build a stand and put it on my bench for now. I had been considering the smaller machine so I could also get the tooling. But if it's really that much better, it might be worth it to consider.

Z2V, that's very generous of you. Thanks for the offer.
 

ttabbal

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#13
Wow, thanks mikey! You guys are great around here. I hope I can contribute more as I learn.

So, that still leaves me with the same question though. What supplies should I be looking for to get started? Is the basic dial indicator enough to get going? I guess I need to start trolling eBay more.. :)
 

Z2V

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#14
You can get the machine, some tool blanks, some scrap metal and at least get used to using the machine. Then as you go you can start thinking about precision.
 

mikey

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#15
Wow, thanks mikey! You guys are great around here. I hope I can contribute more as I learn.

So, that still leaves me with the same question though. What supplies should I be looking for to get started? Is the basic dial indicator enough to get going? I guess I need to start trolling eBay more.. :)
The 1127 comes with all the basic tooling you need other than a drill chuck and a live center. I will send you some 3/8" HSS blanks to play with. If you want to try using carbide tools, PM sells a nice set of SCLCR/L tools with inserts for a nice price: http://www.precisionmatthews.com/shop/38-turning-38-boring-tool-set/

You need a decent dial indicator and a dial test indicator. If you want good quality, Mitutoyo is what I would go for. If you want the best, buy Swiss versions - Compac, B&S, Interapid; more expensive in the short term but much cheaper in the long run. Buy good condition used versions on ebay. You need the DI to center work in your 4 jaw chuck. You need the DTI to evaluate concentricity of your spindle and you will use it a LOT on your milling machine when you have one.

You already have dial calipers and mics so you're good there. Spotting drills, drill bits, center drills come next. Later, get boring bars. I would not invest in external carbide threading tools for now; they are relatively expensive and you can cut very good threads with a HSS threading tool for now. For internal threading you can use taps for now; invest in a decent internal threading bar/bars later.

If you need advice on which drills, boring tools, threading tools when you are ready to buy them, ask and we'll all chip in advice. Right now, you need to decide on a lathe. That will determine which drill chuck and live center you need. The rest can come later.

Oh, almost forgot. When your lathe shows up, buy some 6061-T6 and some 12L14 mild steel to start learning to turn. These materials are easy to machine and will help you to learn how to turn stuff. A good source is an ebay seller here: http://stores.ebay.com/Stoners-Tools-and-Raw-Materials?_rdc=1

When your lathe is on the way, send me a PM with your mailing address and I'll get some tool bits to you.
 

Uglydog

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#17
Nearly all my machine tools and tooling was used when I bought it.
I've upgraded my used stuff with better used stuff as I've learned machining.
Be careful about buying used stuff it can be tired or worn out. Similarly, inexpensive new stuff can be even worse for precision and accuracy.
Some of this stuff you can make yourself.

I've had really good luck with buying used stuff here at HM. This comment is merely truth, not an ad (I've occasionally put stuff up for sale here at HM). Price has been fair or cheap, and quality has always been as described. It often comes with online or even real time telephone coaching if I want/need it.

Daryl
MN
 
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ttabbal

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#18
It sounds like my thought that the DI I have is enough to make sure my workpiece is mostly straight for starting out and getting used to the machine. I fully expect accuracy to be limited by the operator to start with. It's been a long time since I ran a lathe, so I plan on starting with basic stuff. Turn to size, facing, and maybe threading. That should give me plenty of time to find better measuring equipment and fill in gaps for tooling. I've seen a few basic projects around that might be fun to learn with as well.

The longer term goal is stuff like this... http://www.lokiresearch.com/images/Documents/38mm_case.pdf

And I'm sure I'll find lots of interesting things to make as I go.

Thinking of projects, is dead tree good for a lathe bench or is this a good excuse to break out the welding gear? :)
 

Uglydog

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#19
Good and appropriate question!!!
There is currently an active thread on wood lathe benches.
Check it out...

Daryl
MN
 

David S

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#21
If I am looking at the drawing correctly, you may need a steady rest in order to make those internal grooves.

David
 

ttabbal

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#22
If I am looking at the drawing correctly, you may need a steady rest in order to make those internal grooves.

David

I believe that's true. The lathe comes with one, so I should be good there.


Thanks for the bench links RandyM!
 

richl

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#23
1 1/2" bore thru the headstock and a steady rest that is capable to hold that size piece. The ones typically sold with the smaller lathes may not have that capacity.
Just things to look out for. You have the headstock bore, good choice on a lathe. It's a quagmire of features, specs, and lathe/machinist jargon.

Good luck :encourage:
 

Nogoingback

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#24
Wow, thanks mikey! You guys are great around here. I hope I can contribute more as I learn.

So, that still leaves me with the same question though. What supplies should I be looking for to get started? Is the basic dial indicator enough to get going? I guess I need to start trolling eBay more.. :)

Here's another source of micrometers, indicators etc. These guys sell refurbished tools at reasonable prices which is a lot better than taking
your chances on eBay. I bought a 2" micrometer from them: they shipped quickly and the tool is fine.

https://shop.idealprec.com/collections/demo-items
 

ttabbal

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#25
Here's another source of micrometers, indicators etc. These guys sell refurbished tools at reasonable prices which is a lot better than taking
your chances on eBay. I bought a 2" micrometer from them: they shipped quickly and the tool is fine.

https://shop.idealprec.com/collections/demo-items

Looks like they have some nice gear. What kind of range and graduation should I be looking for as a basic DI for general use on the lathe? It seems like most would work, but I wonder if I'm missing something..

It doesn't seem like I would ever want a workpiece 0.5" off center, so aligning in a chuck should be fine. I can see measuring movement of the tools perhaps using a longer range though.
 

Asm109

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#27
I don't have DRO's on my lathe. I have a 0.001 resolution 2 inch travel dial indicator mounted on the lathe bed.
I also have a .030 range 0.0001 resolution DTI for indicating in chucks and tapers and such.
 

Uglydog

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#28
I didn't get started on this thread to sell stuff. Really I didn't...
I'm off to work for my weekend shift.
However, on Monday I'll list some inspection equipment in the for sale here at HM.

Daryl
MN
 

Bob Korves

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#29
However, on Monday I'll list some inspection equipment in the for sale here at HM.
Sale here on HM? Just your stuff, or is there a site wide sale I should really know about? :)
 

ttabbal

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#30
Ok. So I order an 1127. What do I need to get it ready to make chips? I've never set up a new machine before. Reading up, sounds like after running things a bit for testing, I would be smart to clean it up really well and change the oil.

Can it sit on my bench or does it need to be bolted down? I can get some dead trees in to make a stand too. Might be a fun project while I wait.

I'm looking at the manual for the 1228 as Matt has mentioned they are very similar.

Things to get...

Degreaser to remove the "waxy oil". They recommend against brake cleaners and acetone. Any recommendations?
Fresh oil. Type? ISO 68.. Any recommended brands?
It mentions including an oiler, so I'm probably good there.
Some round stock of the previously mentioned types. 1" diameter?

Remove schmoo
Check oil level
Test and inspect
Clean and oil change, lube the ball oilers
Level and test for taper etc..
Turn perfectly good stock into chips..
Drool over other tooling I'll want later (there's always another tool to drool at)
 
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