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Burke No. 0

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Gary Ayres

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#32
Good progress again today.

First, the table casting was stripped of the old light green paint:

table casting stripped top.JPG table casting stripped underside.JPG

It was then given three coats of matt black stove paint and reinstalled on the machine. OK - this picture proves that I'd rather faff about with vintage machine tools than weed my back yard:

table reinstalled.JPG

I then started working on making a rear spindle locking nut. On another forum I was given to understand that using a tap to match the external thread on the back of the spindle would be a fool's errand. However, rather than embark upon learning screwcutting (and clamber over my drill press to crane into the corner of my tiny workshop to access the lathe changewheels), use a tap I'm afraid I did. And here is that tap, proudly displayed on the newly-cleaned table of the Number Zero. It's a bit of a belter:

epic tap.JPG

It worked! Here is a trial 'nut' made from aluminium demonstrating that the tap matches the thread on the spindle:

thread test.JPG

There won't be any further development on the No.0 now for about a month because I'm making three different trips away and will hardly be at home. In the meantime, can you advise me what I should make the spindle locking nuts from? Will bronze or brass do the job? Is aluminium solely for wimps...?

table casting stripped top.JPG table casting stripped underside.JPG table reinstalled.JPG epic tap.JPG thread test.JPG
 
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mattthemuppet

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#35
what a cool looking mill. Sounds like you're stocking up a really neat workshop!

For the rear spindle nut, I would personally make a keyed steel lock washer (you may even be able to buy one), polish it on the bronze bearing side and mill a matching key through the threads on the spindle. Slide it on and then use the nut (personally I'd make it out of steel) to take up the slack in the bearing. A suitably sized belleville washer (I think that's what they're called) between the lock washer and a double nut is another option as this will allow some movement when the machine heats up from use, but maintain the correct bearing preload. Either way, oil from the oiler should keep any friction to a minimum, although you could always grind a couple of oil ways in the washer to make sure.

The first option is sort of how my ancient mini lathe works. Very occasionally I have to slacken it off a touch if the garage is hot and I do a lot of work with it, but most of the time it stays as it is. I tighten it to the point where the chuck stops after 1/2 a rotation or so. I would avoid any kind of compressible washer as the spindle will move when it cuts, leading to chatter and other kinds of mess.

As for the stuck flat head screws, use an impact screwdriver. One of the ones that you hold in your hand and smack the end with a mallet. The impact drives the driver into the screw, so it doesn't slip out, and also provides the shock needed to break the threads loose. I had to use mine to take apart the cross slide on my lathe and it worked a treat, came loose with one tap after several different nerve wracking attempts using a normal screwdriver.
 

Gary Ayres

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#36
Hi MTM - stocking up a neat workshop, or feeding a burgeoning addiction. Or both... :)

Interesting advice regarding the nut and washer. What I think I'll do is start off with the simplest solutiuon (i.e. two locking nuts behind the bearing and a similar arrangement in front of it) and see how it goes. I think the machine was probably originally designed that way. Also, I'm not too keen to cut a keyway in the spindle if I can avoid it. If problems become apparent with heat or anything else (and as I get braver!) I could look towards implementing a system along the lines of your suggestion. I do still wonder whether simple fibre washers might do the job quite well, though.

As for the screws, they are actually hex head, not slotted. Is there such a thing as an impact screwdriver for hex head? It would have to be a very small one though. That said, the problem isn't a huge one because there's no real need for me to dismantle the table. I only managed to get two of the screws out. On each of the table surface plates, the central screw hole is actually an oiling point (you can see the word 'OIL' marked on the front one in the picture). The oil goes down into the slideways for the x-axis travel. One of the two screws I managed to get out was one of the oiling point screws - the only other one it would really be useful to remove is the other oiling point screw. A very small hex head impact driver (if such a thing exists) might be just the job for that.

Thank you!

gary
 

mattthemuppet

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#37
as addictions go, it's probably one of the more socially acceptable/ useful ones :)

I vaguely remember reading somewhere else on here another machine tool that held the spindle in the same way - double nut in front of and behind the rear bearing, so I'm sure that would work, I just liked the sound of my approach! I'd be wary of anything, like a squishy washer, in the preload set up that can't resist a bunch of pressure before deforming as even a hair off snug on my lathe spindle allows a ton of run out. Still, that might be because it's an ancient abused tool that's used way beyond its reasonable work envelope :D

My impact screwdriver uses hex shank bits, so I'm sure you'd be able to find hex shank hex head bits for one. The big plus is that using one would reduce the risk of rounding that small hex bolts are prone to, something I've fought with a lot in the past.
 

Gary Ayres

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#38
Ah, yes - I take your point about the squishy washer. The No 0 I'm working on is in surprisingly good condition. As far as I'm aware for at least the last third of its life the only abuse it has suffered was to sit under someone's workbench for 30 years, and it shows very few signs of having been abused prior to that. However, I can see that a soft washer could lead to accuracy problems. You have certainly given me some food for thought, particularly if my initial attempts at solution don't work out.

On the table screws: good to know. Although it may not be essential to get them out, it would be nice to know that I can, especially that second oiler screw. Will look into what you suggest.

Agreed - not the most destructive of addictions. Quite an expensive one, though. At least until I figure out how to get some of the money I have have spent back again. That could take me a while... :)

Cheers,

gary
 

mattthemuppet

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#39
well, I don't drink, take drugs or have mistresses (!!) and if I'm not in the house, at work or on the bike my wife knows that she can always find me in the garage. Plus she thinks it's endearing that I'm such a toolaholic, at least until she found out how much they cost to move across country!
 

Gary Ayres

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#40
Ha, yes. My girlfriend and I keep separate accounts. Something she has never regretted... :allgood:
 

Gary Ayres

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#41
Managed to find some time between trips to do a little more work on the spindle locking arrangements. As previously noted, there should be two locking nuts behind and two in front of the rear bearing. Of the four, only one was present on the machine - in front of the bearing. Unlike the portion of the spindle behind the bearing (which is completely threaded), the spindle in front of the bearing has unthreaded space available forward of the threaded portion. Because of this, I was able to make a bronze collar as backup for the existing nut instead of a second nut. No threading required, you see - just a drilled and tapped hole for a grub screw which rests against the unthreaded portion of the spindle. In this way I avoided damaging the existing threads with the grub screw. Because there is minimal thrust, this grub screw probably won't need a locating point drilled in the spindle.

rear spindle collar.JPG

rear spindle collar.JPG
 

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#43
Back for a couple of days before my last trip away for the Summer...

Mike (aka Ulma Doctor), who has contributed comments higher up in this thread, very kindly sent me (from California) an endmill holder to fit this machine. Made by the Putnam Tool Co., Detroit, Michigan, it has a B&S #7 taper and holds a 3/8" endmill. It's a cool vintage piece of tooling which really suits the machine and has tons more character than the set of import collets I bought. Here it is:

endmill holder 1.JPG endmill holder 2.JPG endmill holder in situ.JPG

Cheers Mike! :thanks:

Now, I might even be able to make some progress with the rear spindle locking nuts before I go away again...

endmill holder 1.JPG endmill holder 2.JPG endmill holder in situ.JPG
 

Gary Ayres

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#44
Woodtickgreg and Ulma Doctor - thanks for the like and the thanks.

Now, at last, the rear spindle locking nuts which have been keeping me awake at nights...

I went for a splined (I hope I'm using the term correctly) thumb-nut kind of approach (due to the minimal level of thrust which they will bear), and to achieve this - after roughly boring out some brass stock on the lathe - once again called upon the services of the good old Dore Westbury, which I have come to love:

milling splines.JPG milling splines 2.JPG

Rocking the rotary table, dancing with the dividing plate, then back to the lathe to part off the two nuts:

parting off nuts.JPG

These were the easy bits. However, due to what my daughter refers to as a 'rookie error' in measuring the spindle thread and an elusive final bore, cuttiing the threads was a bit of a mission. However, my trusty tap came up trumps in the end, resulting in the final nuts:

rear spindle locking nuts.JPG

They fit the spindle. I just hope they remain locked together in the right place at speed...

When I come back from my trip away I plan to faff about with stainless steel washers to try to find a satisfactory but easy way to minimise friction against the bearings.

Cheers guys :))

milling splines.JPG milling splines 2.JPG parting off nuts.JPG rear spindle locking nuts.JPG
 
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Gary Ayres

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#45
Back from my travels.

I bored and turned two steel washers to size and gave the pulleys a polish. All of the components for the spindle are now complete. Here they are, disassembled but laid out in the correct order. The spanners represent the plain bearings. Left is the back, right is the front end. So, from left to right we have: 2 brass locking nuts, a steel washer, the rear bearing, a steel washer, an original steel locking nut, a bronze locking collar with grub screw, the pulleys, the front bearing, an endmill holder. Below that lot is the spindle itself:

spindle components.JPG


Here is the completed spindle, assembled and in situ on the machine:

spindle in situ.JPG

I have taken quite a bit bit of advice to get me to this point, and I see no reason why this arrangement shouldn't work. However, my plan is to keep it like this until I have tested it out under power. As you will see in due course, it will be quite some time before I do this...

Meanwhile, the next thing is the drawbar...

spindle components.JPG spindle in situ.JPG
 

Gary Ayres

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#49
Many thanks, guys. Very kind of you.

Nels - interestingly I just read Mick's blog earlier today via another forum. It's very impressive, and what a fine machine. There is however sometimes some confusion as there are two different horizontal mills that are commonly called the Burke No.1. One of these is the one Mick has, which I believe is actually a U.S. Machine Tools No.1 but often gets called a Burke because the two companies later merged. The other Burke No.1 is a small horizontal benchtop mill pretty similar to the No.0 but a little bit bigger, as shown in the first picture of catalogue pages below. The second photograph shows - I believe - two No.1's on stands. The third image - another catalogue page - is interesting because the machine looks like a No.1 but the dimensions are different from either the No.1 or the No.0 as specified in the first catalogue pages. The catalogue also locates Burke in Cleveland, Ohio, while the raised lettering on the two in the photo (and on my No.0) places Burke in Conneaut, Ohio. This change may have something to do with the merger with U.S. Machine Tools but I have no idea what this machine is. It may be a different version of the original Burke No.1, but it definitely isn't a U.S. Machine Tools No.1 like Mick's. If you are reading this and you know, please feel free to put a post about it on this thread.

Burke_miller_0_and_1_small.jpg Burke_no_1_mills_small.jpg

modern-machinery-v017-n05-1905-05-p0231-img0239-burke-bench-mill-ad-crop-1460x1218.png Burke_miller_0_and_1_small.jpg Burke_no_1_mills_small.jpg
 
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core-oil

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#51
Lovely work Gary, That is a sweet little machine & is a nice complimentary machine to your Dore Westbury, ( Westbury was a genius) Thanks also to all the guys who have added to this excellent thread also
 

Gary Ayres

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#52
Hi core-oil, and many thanks for your kind words.

I live in Guernsey but am actually from Dumfries - just down the road from you :)
 

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#53
Now, the drawbar.

Drawing inspiration from (i.e. stealing the idea from) the blue coloured No 0 pictured near the start of this thread, I decided that the machine would look good with a big chunky locking knob at the back of the drawbar. I turned a piece of aluminium on the lathe using my new radius turning attachment to get a nice curve, and cut grooves using the Dore Westbury and dividing setup. A polish up resulted in the finished knob:

turning drawbar knob.JPG milling drawbar knob.jpg drawbar knob.jpg

I also used dies to cut threads on the ends of a section of steel bar to make the drawbar, and turned a collar to fit between the knob and the drawbar to act as a spacer and to keep the back end of the drawbar centred:

drawbar knob and collar.jpg

The pictures below show the drawbar assembly plus a Brown and Sharpe No.7 collet and endmill:

drawbar components.jpg drawbar assembled.jpg

Here is the completed drawbar in situ on the machine:

drawbar in situ.JPG

Almost there...

drawbar knob.jpg drawbar knob and collar.jpg drawbar components.jpg drawbar assembled.jpg drawbar in situ.JPG turning drawbar knob.JPG milling drawbar knob.jpg
 
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Gary Ayres

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#56
Done at last!

Burke No 0 Restoration (small).jpg

But what about the motor?

Well, that question is answered in another thread .

Many thanks, guys, for all your kind interest, advice and support.

Now, I'd better do something about those weeds... ;-)

Burke No 0 Restoration (small).jpg
 
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mattthemuppet

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#57
what a beautiful job, but with only one tiny picture?! We need, nay, demand more! That's some really fantastic work there Gary and you should be proud of yourself. It almost, but not quite, inspires me to do the same to my ancient no-name mini lathe and WT drill press. One day, when I have more time (or just time) than I do now.
 

Gary Ayres

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#58
Matt -

thanks for your feedback. I encourage you to restore your old machines!

OK - Tony at Lathes UK has asked me to do a few good quality pictures of the machine which he will post on his wonderful archive. Once he has done so, I'll post a link in this thread.

All the best,

gary

:))
 
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Ulma Doctor

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#59
just beautiful work Gary!!!
thanks for taking the time to share your machine rebuild with us.
all the best
mike:))
 
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