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Burke No. 0

Discussion in 'BURKE-US MACHINE TOOL & BARKER MACHINES' started by Gary Ayres, Jul 9, 2014.

  1. Gary Ayres

    Gary Ayres Guernsey Active User Active Member

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    Hi -

    thought I'd introduce myself as I just received a 'new' Burke No.0 today. Having found that there is very little information about the No. 0 online and very few pictures, I thought I'd better raise its profile a bit!

    I live in the British Channel Islands and had the machine shipped over from mainland England after buying it on Gumtree. It has been in England for at least 35 years but probably much longer. My intention is to restore it to working order. It's in pretty good condition - the X and Y axes slide beautifully. The knee is stuck but I'm sure it will free up easily enough once it has been stripped down and cleaned up. The spindle runs freely but the oilers will need some attention. Also, of course, it needs some pulleys. Overall, it's a tiny gem...

    Here it is:

    Burke No 0 (small).JPG

    I'll probably be back with some questions as I work on the mill over the next few weeks as I'm fairly new to machining...

    Cheers,

    gary

    Burke No 0 (small).JPG
     
  2. Don B

    Don B Canada Active User Active Member

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    That will be a nice little machine, I was recently given a No.4 hand mill, I'm going to convert it to a little surface grinder this winter if time allows, there's some info on burke mills here.

    http://vintagemachinery.org/mfgindex/detail.aspx?id=132&tab=4

    But I don't think the 0 is there, I just recently seen a restored one in a thread someplace if I can find it I'll post the link.
     
  3. Gary Ayres

    Gary Ayres Guernsey Active User Active Member

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    Hi Don -

    was it this one, by any chance?:

    #0.jpeg

    I ask because it's the only photo of a recently restored No. 0 I could find on the net.

    I have already seen the link you posted - as you say, the No. 0 is conspicuous by its absence, as it is in most Burke sites and forums that I have seen.

    The No. 4 is a nice machine, I reckon - should be an enjoyable way to spend the Winter months.

    I lived in Nova Scotia - Truro - for a year in the 1980's. Loved it... :))

    All the best,

    gary

    #0.jpeg
     
  4. Don B

    Don B Canada Active User Active Member

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    Hi Gary

    Yes Sir that's the one, if I had a No.0 I wouldn't be considering hacking it up but the No.4's seem to be plentiful enough.
    Truro, it's a small world by times, my wife and I are hoping to move there in the near future, my wife has an ailing mother in New Glasgow and we have a Grandson in Halifax, split the difference so to speak, you'll know what I mean.
    Good to have met you, hopefully we'll talk in the future.

    Don
     
  5. Gary Ayres

    Gary Ayres Guernsey Active User Active Member

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    I do indeed, Don.

    Yes, No. 4's appear to be common in North America. I don't think any Burkes are common on this side of the Atlantic, though.

    Good to chat with you too...

    Cheers,

    gary
     
  6. Gary Ayres

    Gary Ayres Guernsey Active User Active Member

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    Thought I'd add a couple of pictures as my restoration project is now under way. Smell that kerosene...



    Burke 0~11 July2.JPG Burke 0~11 July1.JPG

    Burke 0~11 July2.JPG Burke 0~11 July1.JPG
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2014
  7. Gary Ayres

    Gary Ayres Guernsey Active User Active Member

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    A few more pics. Stripped old paint from main casting and applied first coat of new matt black stove paint. Bit of an experiment to use that kind of paint on a machine, but it seems to work well on stoves...

    Work in progress.

    burke stripped 1.jpg downtotheiron.jpg wetpaint1.jpg

    burke stripped 1.jpg downtotheiron.jpg wetpaint1.jpg
     
  8. Gary Ayres

    Gary Ayres Guernsey Active User Active Member

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    Three coats of matt black and the raised lettering picked out in grey. Oh - and I couldn't resist putting a couple of cherries on top even though the cake isn't fully baked yet. I know you won't blame me though... ;-)

    lettering.JPG oilers.JPG

    lettering.JPG oilers.JPG
     
  9. Don B

    Don B Canada Active User Active Member

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    That looks great Gary...!:))
     
  10. Gary Ayres

    Gary Ayres Guernsey Active User Active Member

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    Many thanks Don - very kind of you.
     
  11. 12bolts

    12bolts Global Moderator Staff Member Active Member

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    Nice job. Looking forward to seeing it complete

    Cheers Phil
     
  12. Gary Ayres

    Gary Ayres Guernsey Active User Active Member

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    Cheers Phil :))
     
  13. Gary Ayres

    Gary Ayres Guernsey Active User Active Member

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    I bought a V-belt step pulley which I had to machine to fit. First of all, widening the bore to fit the spindle:

    boring.JPG

    Then turning off the widest pulley (as the whole thing was too big to fit in the 'throat' of the mill):

    sizing1.JPG sizing2.JPG sizing3.JPG

    - - - Updated - - -

    And now, a question.

    Please see photo below. In order to hold the spindle in position and stop it from sliding back and forward I'll obviously need to screw some kind of nut or threaded collar on the back end of it. However, that will move with the spindle and rub against the static face of the bronze bearing housing. Can any of you guys advise me of the best thing to use as a washer or spacer to minimise friction between the collar and the bearing? I have acetal, bronze, brass, steel... and I think I have also heard of someone using some kind of fibre washer. Or is it ok just to let a steel collar run against the bronze? I have a similar issue with the collar at the other side of the bearing. Advice appreciated! :thinking:

    bearingquestion.JPG

    boring.JPG sizing1.JPG sizing2.JPG sizing3.JPG bearingquestion.JPG
     
  14. Gary Ayres

    Gary Ayres Guernsey Active User Active Member

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    I decided to try fibre washers as I reckon that they will wear out before anything else does and are replaceable. However, after I go them someone recommended surface ground steel, which I will try if I have any issues with the fibre ones.

    - - - Updated - - -

    The washers problem is pretty minor in comparison to my next question. The nut at the back of the spindle is the only thing that appears to be missing from this machine. It appears to be 15/16" x 20 tpi, which - in my part of the world at least - is about as non-standard as it gets. It's a very fine and shallow thread. As it's an American machine, is it likely to be a UNS thread? If so, there's a tap for sale which I think meets the spec. If possible, I'd rather use a tap than try to cut it on the lathe. Would very much welcome your thoughts on this...
     
  15. Gary Ayres

    Gary Ayres Guernsey Active User Active Member

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    Have decided to cut the thread on the lathe. Time to learn a new skill...:))
     
  16. Ulma Doctor

    Ulma Doctor Infinitely Curious H-M Supporter-Premium

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    thanks for starting the thread, it's very interesting to see the lil machine coming together!
    all the best
    mike:))
     
  17. Gary Ayres

    Gary Ayres Guernsey Active User Active Member

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    Thank you Mike.

    gary
     
  18. Gary Ayres

    Gary Ayres Guernsey Active User Active Member

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    At risk of seeming inconsistent I have changed my mind and am going to try the tap option for the spindle nut.

    Reasons:


    • I just remembered that both my lathes have metric leadscrews

    • A 15/16" x 20 tpi tap was available on ebay UK for GBP 18 (31 US Dollars) including postage.
    Surfing around, I gather that a metric lathe can cut imperial threads but that it's not always straightforward, and I'd like to get the job done as simply and quickly as possible. If it's the right tap, I can always make 2 or 3 of the nuts I need and then sell the tap on. If it's not, then it's back to the lathe idea.


    I have decided to learn to cut threads on the lathe soon, but will start with metric ones...
     
  19. starion007

    starion007 Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Hi Gary, I was looking over the pictures of the complete mill and yours and wonder about a coupe of things. You mentioned that you wanted to make this nut and a backing washer/shim to keep the spindle from backing out. I'm wondering if the pulley assemble with hardened washers against the inside edges of the spindle supports actually hold the spindle in place? The bolt hole or flat on the spindle looks like where the pulley locks in place.
    Also the threaded end, in the picture of a completed machine kind of looks like an adapter for a collet closer? I would think you need something there to hold cutters? Maybe it is missing a draw-bar?

    Just my ramblings, maybe relevant maybe not, lol

    Cool machine, and a cool project.

    Mark
     
  20. Gary Ayres

    Gary Ayres Guernsey Active User Active Member

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    Hi Mark -

    thanks for all your good thoughts.

    It's possible that in the original machine the pulley cone (which would have been 3 flat belt pulleys) played a part in holding the spindle in place. And yes, the hole in the spindle is where the grub screw holding the pulleys would have rested. However, the pulleys were missing from the machine when I bought it. I'm using a v-belt step pulley which is probably shorter so if I were to follow your suggestion some spacers would be required and I think that could work.

    That said, the spindle will not slide out towards the back end of the machine because the front bearing is tapered (as is the front end of the spindle, to match). The only way that the spindle will slide out is forward, so if I were to use something on the insides of the spindle supports to prevent this it would have to be against the inside of the front bearing. That would leave the rear end of the spindle 'floating', if you follow me, so I think that plan A might still be the one to try first, i.e. the spindle is held in place by the taper on the front bearing and a nut or collar on the outside of the rear bearing (i.e. where the thread is).Actually, I have just looked and someone on the other forum I am discussing this on has suggested the use of two locking collars, one fore and one aft of the rear bearing, with the tapered front end of the spindle floating in the front bearing with a tiny amount of play.

    Yes, it's definitely missing a drawbar - something I'll have to make. However, don't know if I'm understanding you correctly or not, but the threaded end is at the rear. I guess it would have been threaded either for something to tension the drawbar with, or for a spindle locking nut. The front end takes Brown and Sharpe #7 collets. At least I hope it does, because I have just ordered a set from your side of the Atlantic!


    Great to know, Mark! Thanks for your encouragement :))

    gary
     
  21. starion007

    starion007 Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Hi Gary, I see what you mean now about the tapers. I was thinking the spindle rode in straight bushings, I also had the front and back swapped! lol
    I have a Starke #4 lathe, (early 1900's) and it uses the same type system with a tapered front and a spanner nut at the back, pulleys in the middle.

    Your making great progress, keep up the good work!!


    Mark
     
  22. Gary Ayres

    Gary Ayres Guernsey Active User Active Member

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    Understood, Mark.

    Following input on another forum I think that in the original machine there would have been two threaded collars in front of the rear bearing and two threaded collars aft of it.That way you can fine-tune the way that the front taper of the spindle sits in the bearing, then lock it in position. I need to replicate that principle, which shouldn't be too difficult now that I 'get' it.

    BTW a couple of other people also had the front and back of the machine mixed up. Very easy to do when looking at photos.

    Again, thanks for your positive thoughts. I hope to make a bit more progress over the weekend.

    Cheers,

    g
     
  23. Gary Ayres

    Gary Ayres Guernsey Active User Active Member

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    Stripping old paint off and repainting the knee and saddle.

    kneerepaint1.JPG kneerepaint2.JPG
    kneerepaint3.JPG kneerepaint4.JPG

    kneerepaint1.JPG kneerepaint2.JPG kneerepaint3.JPG kneerepaint4.JPG
     
  24. Gary Ayres

    Gary Ayres Guernsey Active User Active Member

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    Knee and saddle replaced and trial fit of pulleys. Also, I had a spare handwheel left over from a mini-lathe upgrade a couple of years ago, so I have decided to modify it for the No. 0 so that it can be used as an alternative to the lever feed on the z axis, like the blue mill higher up in the thread. I will of course also keep the lever so that it can be swapped over with the handwheel at any time.

    The handwheel will need to be bored out to fit the shaft. It will also need to be faced off because much as I love metallic red, this mill does not require it :shocked:. Neither did the mini-lathe, actually... Might also mill a couple of curved slots in the wheel on the rotary table for funkiness's sake...


    kneereplaced.JPG handwheel.JPG

    kneereplaced.JPG handwheel.JPG
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2014
  25. Gary Ayres

    Gary Ayres Guernsey Active User Active Member

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    The feed hand levers for the x and z axes: the heads - which are original - were stripped of the old light green paint and painted matt black. I suspect the handles are not original, but they are pretty cool anyway. They are made of aluminium and they polished up nice and shiny. They are also long - each lever stood on end is as long as the mill is high. This is much longer than the single handle which can be seen on the blue example above.

    levers.JPG

    levers.JPG
     
  26. Gary Ayres

    Gary Ayres Guernsey Active User Active Member

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    Here are the levers temporarily attached to the mill in development, just to give a sense of what it looks like:

    leversattached.JPG

    Also, the Brown & Sharpe #7 collets arrived today, all the way from China via America. They are the right size. Yay!

    collet.JPG colletsfit.JPG

    leversattached.JPG collet.JPG colletsfit.JPG
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2014
  27. Gary Ayres

    Gary Ayres Guernsey Active User Active Member

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    Step pulleys fitted to spindle: three equidistant holes drilled through the bottom of the groove of the smallest pulley and tapped M6 for grub screws. Corresponding locating points drilled in spindle; pulley was then secured with grub screws. It's positioned to give clearance to a Powertwist link belt. This job was done on my Dore Westbury mill, which I bought in May this year and have not long finished restoring. It was the first time I have used the DW. It's sweet! No comparison to the import plastic-geared machine that it replaced...

    fitting pulleys.JPG

    fitting pulleys.JPG
     
  28. Gary Ayres

    Gary Ayres Guernsey Active User Active Member

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    Now on to properly fitting the pulleys.

    This is the original step-pulley as purchased:

    pulleys original.JPG

    It was too big to fit the machine, so as shown higher in the thread, I had to get rid of the largest pulley:

    pulleys turned 1.JPG

    As you can see, this left a plain cylindrical section where the large pulley had been. Initially my intention had been to keep this section as a kind of visual 'nod' to the fact that the machine in its original state would have had flat belt pulleys (though of course the flat section shown here would not operate as a pulley, it was to be for visual effect only). However, I intend to use a Powertwist link belt to drive the machine. Due to the small size of the mill, there is not much clearance between the bottom of the pulleys and the main casting. To prevent the belt from fouling the top part of the main casting, the pulleys have to sit quite far back on the spindle where the gap at the top of the casting is deepest. With the flat section in place as shown above, this was problematic because (1) the flat section overhung the rear bearing and blocked access to the threaded part of the spindle and the inner spindle locking nut and (2) the whole thing looked unbalanced from a visual point of view. I therefore had to turn off the flat section, leaving me with this:

    pulleys turned 2.JPG

    This now allows access to the spindle locking nut. Also, although it's not too obvious from the picture (due to the camera angle) it looks more balanced as there is a gap of about 1 cm between the back edge of the largest pulley and the front of the rear bearing. That said, the pulleys still sit a bit further back on the spindle than I'd ideally like from an aesthetic point of view. However, while I am using an A-section Powertwist link belt this is as good as it's going to get. In any case, the system should now drive the spindle with a satisfying amount of torque.

    pulleys original.JPG pulleys turned 1.JPG pulleys turned 2.JPG
     
  29. Gary Ayres

    Gary Ayres Guernsey Active User Active Member

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    Thanks for the likes, guys. Very kind of you.

    And now to handwheels - a new one for the Z-axis and the original one for the Y-axis. I took the shiny red handwheel pictured a few posts above and faced it off roughly in the lathe to lose the red. I then milled two curved slots in it using a rotary table on the Dore Westbury, after which I gave it a few finishing passes in the lathe. The bore was then widened to fit the z-axis shaft which controls the rack and pinion lifting mechanism for the knee. Finally, I gave it a polish:

    curved slots.JPG boring handwheel.jpg finished handwheel.JPG

    Now, in the picture below two things are apparent. One is the condition of the table prior to it being cleaned up, and the other is the way that a previous owner had mounted the existing Y-axis handwheel. A collar - which was too wide for the shaft - had been inserted behind the handwheel. This caused the handwheel to sit too far out on its shaft so that the cap-head screw that you can see in the picture did not sit in the locating point and the threaded section at the end of the shaft did not protrude out of the bore of the wheel:

    table before.JPG

    I replaced the cap head screw with a grub screw and got rid of the offending collar, allowing the grub screw to rest in the locating point. This also gave some clearance to the shaft so I was able to finish off its threaded end with a couple of washers and a domed nut. The picture below shows both handwheels (existing and new) properly in situ. The new handwheel can be easily removed and so can be regarded as interchangeable with the original lever. The boss was already pre-drilled and tapped so I drilled a corresponding locating point in the shaft for a grub screw:

    handwheels in situ.JPG

    To finish off a good day of progress, I got going on the table with WD-40, Scotch-Brite and sandpaper. A tedious task, it has to be said. The picture below shows the result and that's as far as I'm going to go with it. The machine is possibly 100-plus years old, so why kill myself trying to make it look brand new? IMHO the residual patina looks good anyway. The surrounding table casting will of course be painted black. Incidentally, despite soaking the table in kerosene for two weeks and then drowning it several times in WD-40, I couldn't take it down any further as the screws holding the flat strips to the casting just wouldn't come out without me chewing their heads. I decided just to leave well alone...

    table cleaned.JPG

    curved slots.JPG boring handwheel.jpg finished handwheel.JPG table before.JPG handwheels in situ.JPG table cleaned.JPG
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2014
  30. Don B

    Don B Canada Active User Active Member

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