• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.
  • Guest,  We want to wish You and Your Family a Healthy, Happy Thanksgiving! Click the "X" at the top right corner to remove this notice)
  • PLEASE: Read the FORUM RULES BEFORE registering!

4

Building the Stevens Favorite

3
Like what you see?
Click here to donate to this forum and upgrade your account!
10

Tom Griffin

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Nov 7, 2011
Messages
1,383
Likes
21
TomG A few weeks ago I 'told' the guys on Home Gunsmithing forum about your Stevens Favorite build thread..Wanted the guys to see a very well documented build ..This thread of yours is just exceptionally well presented..
Thanks!

I've been doing more thinking than building lately so the updates have been few and far between. Once I get the drilling and rifling figured out for the barrel, they will pick up. There is still a lot to do.

I checked out the Home Gunsmithing site and got another idea for a pretty simple rifling machine made from PVC pipe and cable. I wish there was a little more detail in the write up though, especially regarding the cutter.

Tom
 

Tony Wells

Former Vice President
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
Jan 22, 2011
Messages
6,872
Likes
19,421
This thought just popped into my head, so for what that's worth.... I wonder if you couldn't take an expansion reamer, the kind with the adjustment screw in the end (and yes, I know what they are really for) and do a serious regrind on it for the rifling,and adjust it out on each pass after you drag it through. Part of it could be just under the smooth bore size, and act as a guide, and a cable and swivel used to pull it.

Just a wild idea that later I'll probably think of a half dozen reasons not to do that.
 

Tom Griffin

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Nov 7, 2011
Messages
1,383
Likes
21
This thought just popped into my head, so for what that's worth.... I wonder if you couldn't take an expansion reamer, the kind with the adjustment screw in the end (and yes, I know what they are really for) and do a serious regrind on it for the rifling,and adjust it out on each pass after you drag it through. Part of it could be just under the smooth bore size, and act as a guide, and a cable and swivel used to pull it.

Just a wild idea that later I'll probably think of a half dozen reasons not to do that.
Tony,

I think the problem would be size. By the time you grind down a 1/4" expansion reamer to .218, there wouldn't be much left. Not sure what size the screw is in them. The rifling heads are typically a rod of the bore diameter (.218 in this case) with pivoted hook cutter and a wedge to vary the cutting depth. It needs to be attached to a solid pull shaft to rotate it at the appropriate rate of twist. Cutting depth is generally a few tenths per pass. I'll probably end up making one similar to the one shown below.

Tom

cutter_apart2.jpg
 

Attachments

Tom Griffin

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Nov 7, 2011
Messages
1,383
Likes
21
I finally got around to finishing up the cat heads. The one for the spindle needed a relief cut in the taper and a locking pin which I made from a 10-32 button head cap screw. It also needed a hole for a spanner wrench.

012_5.JPG

The head for the outboard end of the spindle needed to be quite large to mount over the locking ring for the collet closer so it required 4" round instead of the 3" I used for the spindle end. Too bad I didn't realize that before I cut an extra piece of 3" :rant: Both heads also needed a bunch of 5/16-24 set screws to mount them and to hold the barrel.

Here are a couple of pics showing the cat heads in place holding the barrel.

010_6.JPG

The cat head on the spindle is probably only useful to the gunsmith, but the outboard head is useful to keep long pieces of stock from getting off center and vibrating the lathe.

011_5.JPG
 

Attachments

Tom Griffin

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Nov 7, 2011
Messages
1,383
Likes
21
Tom, a bunch of the pictures earlier in the thread are missing. Arrgh!
Yes, it's a mess. It looks like the pics got botched up the early part of the thread then were then re-posted later on. Truthfully, I'm not sure what is there and what is missing. The thread is posted over on MetalWorking Fun in its entirety if something is missing here. I should probably just delete the thread and start over, but a lot of good comments would be lost. Maybe Tony can figure out a way to sort it out, but it won't be easy.

Tom


TRX: I went back and took another look and it appears the entire thread has been re-posted on page five. It's kind of weird, but that's the way it is. :headscratch:
 
Last edited:

Tony Wells

Former Vice President
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
Jan 22, 2011
Messages
6,872
Likes
19,421
I'll look into that when I get back in this afternoon, Tom. I'm going to a hospital about 2 hours away that wants iPod docks in the 2 new OR's they added so that the surgeons can rock out during the cutting. Already put in some time wiring in some nice speakers in the ceiling and pulling some of the wiring necessary. I would never have thought that Doctors would have been that fussy about something like that but some of them get pretty uptight if they can't listen to their favorite tunes while operating. They already have streaming music from the cable company, and a way to connect a laptop to play into the system, but they want iPod docks. Crazy.
 

TRX

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2012
Messages
67
Likes
17
I wondered about the apparent reposts. It still looked like some of the setup and tooling pictures were missing, though.

It's such a nice project, it's a shame for the thread to get messed up!
 

Tom Griffin

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Nov 7, 2011
Messages
1,383
Likes
21
Today I was working on a method of holding the gun drill in my lathe. Since the drill is actually longer than the lathe I decided that rather than hold the drill with the 3/4" shank, I would hold it in the middle with the boring bar holder. This required a special adapter (of course) to hold the funky shaped drill shank without crushing it. The adapter consists of a 3/4" piece of round with a 3/16" groove in it that has a radius in the bottom to match the drill shank. A 3/16" rectangular bar with a 120º included angle goes in the slot to clamp on the drill and a couple of collars with cap screws provides the clamping force. With this set-up I should be able to grip the drill close to the end of the barrel so I won't need to make a steady brace to support the center, although some sort of support will still be needed on the end of the drill where the coolant hoses attach.

Tom

003_13.JPG

001_18.JPG

002_18.JPG
 

Attachments

Bill Gruby

Global Moderator
Staff member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jul 13, 2012
Messages
5,430
Likes
1,900
Now yer talking. You can choke up on that long drill and minimize flex. It will also maintain a good location. You da man Tom. Yes I'm still watchin this one.

"Billy G"
 

Tony Wells

Former Vice President
Staff member
Administrator
Joined
Jan 22, 2011
Messages
6,872
Likes
19,421
Tom, what's the slowest feed you have on that lathe? I would imagine you know it will require a slow feed, and there are recommendation tables available. I'm curious as to how this turns out. I need to build a dedicated drilling machine for a repeat job I do. It's not as long, and larger diameter, but I'll shamelessly use what you show to add to what I know about deep hole drilling.
 

Tom Griffin

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Nov 7, 2011
Messages
1,383
Likes
21
Bill: Yeah, that revelation ruined a perfectly good nap. Choking up on it makes everything simpler.

Tony: The Hardinge has a variable electric feed so getting it slow enough won't be a problem. Go ahead and use anything you see here, someone else has likely thought of it before me anyway.

Tom
 

Tom Griffin

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Nov 7, 2011
Messages
1,383
Likes
21
I caught the plague last week so productivity took a bit of a dive. Feeling better this weekend, I managed to put a few hours in on the drilling rig for the Steven's. This is the guide plate used to start the gun drill on center in the end of the barrel. It consists of a plate attached to the ways of the lathe with a drill guide bushing mounted in a hub with a bit of adjustment built in to allow the bushing to be precisely centered on the spindle.

The next step is to make a chip box that attaches to the plate to catch the chip laden cutting oil as it sprays out the end of the barrel during the drilling procedure. It'll just be a simple sheet metal box with some sort of rubber seal on the holes where the drill passes through, and a drain out the bottom.

Tom

005_12.JPG

006_9.JPG
 

Attachments

Siskiyous

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
Oct 24, 2012
Messages
10
Likes
0
These are the best detailed photos and descriptions of setting up to do a deep bore that I have ever ran across. Thank you for taking the time to document it all so well.
 

Tom Griffin

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Nov 7, 2011
Messages
1,383
Likes
21
Thanks.

There are lots of other projects going on at the moment but I'll be getting back to this one shortly. Next in line will be a high pressure pump for the cutting oil and a bracket so I can drive it with my mill. Also the chip box to enclose the guide bushing and catch the oil so I don't end up painting my shop with it.

Tom
 

Tom Griffin

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Nov 7, 2011
Messages
1,383
Likes
21
I had planned to work on the gun drilling set-up over the Christmas break, but the hydraulic pump that I ordered didn't show up on time (it arrived today). Instead, I made a few engineering changes to the tang sight design and finished it up, made the detail drawings and started building it.

The sight is my own design, based on the best features of various sights I found on the internet. It is a flip up design with detents in the up and down position, has a windage adjustment via a thumbwheel, a sliding center to set the elevation and a turn of the peep sight locks everything in position.

Tang%20Sight%20Assembly.TIF.jpg

The first part in the cue was the locknut/windage adjustment. It is a simple block with a notch for the windage thumbwheel and a 1/4-36 tapped hole for the peep sight to screw into. I needed to make it first so I could use it as a thread gauge for the matching 1/4-36 thread on the peep sight.

Next in line was the peep sight itself. The the back side of the hood and the threaded shaft was turned first, then it was parted off and held in a collet to turn the cup shaped bore typical to these sights and knurl the outside.

328.JPG

329.JPG

Next comes the sliding mechanism, windage thumbwheel and the frame to hold it all.

Tom
 

Attachments

Tom Griffin

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Nov 7, 2011
Messages
1,383
Likes
21
A couple more parts for the sight, the center section that holds the peep sight and slides up and down in the frame. The two parts were just simple rectangular blocks with a couple of slots and a pocket in one. The only thing difficult about making them was the small size as shown in the pic.

002_19.JPG

Cutting the 1/32" radii with a form tool in a fly cutter.


003_14.JPG

The frame to hold these first parts is well underway and will be posted tomorrow. It's a bit more complex and will include some rotary table work, so I'll include more pics of the build.

Tom
 

Attachments

Tom Griffin

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Nov 7, 2011
Messages
1,383
Likes
21
The frame for the sight turned out to be fairly involved so I took a few more pics of the process:

004_15.JPG

It's in there.


005_13.JPG

Squared up and sized for width, with extra stock on the ends and the thickness for the rotary table work.


006_10.JPG

The 1" radius belt sanded on one end.


007_8.JPG

Roughing out the blade thickness.


008_6.JPG

Blade finished to size.


009_7.JPG

the 1/8" pivot hole reamed to size and ready to be set up on the rotary table.


010_7.JPG

This is the method I use to center the rotary table on the spindle. I made a snug fitting plug for the center of the table with a snug fitting hole in the center for a 3/8" dowel. With the dowel chucked in a collet, it is inserted in the plug to center the table, the DRO is zeroed out and the table bolted down.


011_6.JPG

The same process is used to center the part. With the rotary table centered on the spindle, a 1/8" pin is held in a collet and the part placed on it, then the angle plate is clamped to the part and then bolted to the table. The part is then indicated parallel to the X axis and the rotary table zeroed out.


012_6.JPG

The part was then counterbored with the end mill and the profile milled. Then the part was flipped and the other side was counterbored.


013_1.JPG

The holes for the detents, a spring and two balls, being drilled.


014_3.JPG

Assembled and partially polished.


015_2.JPG

All that is left is the thumb nut for setting the windage, the #1-72 threaded rod that it rides on and the base.
 

Attachments

Tom Griffin

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Nov 7, 2011
Messages
1,383
Likes
21
I finished machining the base tonight. There is a fair amount of shape to it, such as radiused corners and surfaces typical to firearms, and that will be done by hand, but all the machining is complete.

011_7.JPG

This is the radius on the underside of the base that matches the radius on the tang of the receiver (tang sight, get it?). It was accomplished by mounting a fly cutter in the boring head to achieve the 1.500" radius.


012_7.JPG

Here the basic shape is roughed out and the mounting holes added. The top surface will ultimately have a convex curve to it that will be machined with a 3/4" ball end mill on the rotary table.


015_3.JPG

Here, the base is mounted to a fixture on the rotary table to generate the convex top surface using the 3/4" ball end mill. The fixture is just a piece of 3 1/4" aluminum round with a slot the width of the base and a couple of tapped holes. I figured the slot was good insurance to take some of the load off the 4-40 mounting screws since some of the head on them would be milled off.


016_3.JPG

The base was then mounted to an angle plate on the rotary table to machine the .200" radius on the center section. Both the table and the part were located using gauge pins in the spindle just as with the frame.


017_1.JPG

Here it is as machined. To finish it up, all surfaces will be polished and many of the corners rounded. Since everything is O1, it should polish up nicely. Unfortunately, on a part like this, that will all need to be done by hand. It's the extra work that goes into shaping parts like this that gives a firearm it's character.


018_3.JPG

Almost done. I still need to make the windage thumbnut and assemble the detent mechanism. I see the parts showed up today, some 3/32" compression springs and balls, and the 1-72 threaded rod for the windage adjustment. That will be tomorrow evenings project.
 

Attachments

jumps4

Global Moderator
Staff member
Active Member
Joined
Apr 30, 2012
Messages
2,220
Likes
193
i'm not a gun making fan but i always look forward to your next pics
your skills at manual machining are impressive and i learn a new tip or trick from every setup
thanks for sharing
steve
 

Dranreb

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Sep 20, 2012
Messages
536
Likes
55
Hi Tom, I have just noticed this thread, found it so fascinating I read it all in one hit!

To see such wonderfully skillful work, and with your working methods so well described, has taught me things I can only dream of being able to use!

Thank you for going to the trouble to post it for us to see.

Bernard
 

medicmike

Iron
Registered Member
Joined
Dec 31, 2012
Messages
5
Likes
0
You sir, are a true craftsman. I have played around with gunsmithing, built a 1919 or two and some other projects that I thought were pretty involved, nothing of this "caliber" though. This thread is truly inspiring :))
 

Tom Griffin

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Nov 7, 2011
Messages
1,383
Likes
21
Thanks Mike. In my book, being called a true craftsman is the ultimate compliment. Glad you are enjoying the build.

Tom
 

Alphawolf45

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Sep 3, 2012
Messages
155
Likes
7
That is real Purty work TomG and I'm loving the pictures. Really Like seeing a guy having fun like that.Great hobby ain'it.
 

Tom Griffin

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Nov 7, 2011
Messages
1,383
Likes
21
Thanks!

And a good thing it is just a hobby, I'd starve to death trying to do this stuff for a living. :)

Tom
 

Tom Griffin

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Nov 7, 2011
Messages
1,383
Likes
21
I spent a little time in the shop today and got the mounting screws made for the sight and most of the frame re-made with the latest design changes.

The screws were #5-40 oval head machine screws. Nothing to difficult, but I'll post pictures just the same.

The screws were made of O1 and the first step was to turn the major diameter for the #5 screw and form the 100º angle on the head. There are many ways to form the angle but I chose to generate it by setting the compound to 50º and machining it with the point of the turning tool.

001_8.JPG


Short, small diameter threads like this are a pain to single point so I decided to cheat and use a die. Besides, how often do you get to use a #5-40 die? The body of a drill chuck in the tailstock was pushed against the die stock to ensure a square start.

002_5.JPG


Once the thread was cut, the screws were parted off a little long.

003_4.JPG


They were then held in a collet and the crown machined with a form tool.

004_5.JPG


After "crowning" they were held in a collet block and a .032" x .050" slot cut for the screwdriver.

006_1.JPG

007_1.JPG

Next, the base needs a little more modification, the frame needs to be finished and the leaf spring made for the detent. That will pretty much wrap up the sight project.

Tom
 

Attachments

Tom Griffin

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Nov 7, 2011
Messages
1,383
Likes
21
I finally got all the bugs worked out of the tang sight design and finished it up. By finished, I mean the parts are made, but there are still a few things to do. The elevation and windage marks need to be applied, but that won't be until the gun is shootable and like the rest of the parts, they still need to be hardened, polished and blued. The windage and elevation adjustments work well as does the detent mechanism to lock the sight in the raised and lowered position. I was happy with the way it folds down, completely out of the way, to allow use of the standard iron sights.

Tom


001_19.JPG

004_16.JPG

003_15.JPG
 

Attachments

David

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2011
Messages
302
Likes
5
Tom I have thoroughly enjoyed this build! Credit should be given when credit is due; you are a true craftsman, the quality is amazing!

Thanks so much for taking the time to document this build and sharing it with us!

David
 
6
5 7