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BROWN & SHARPE UNIVERSAL DIVIDING HEAD

benmychree

John York
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#31
Nothing is so bad that it can't be worse! That dividing head has several small problems, but they look to be minor, nothing that cannot be fixed. We are starting with a mechanism that is nearly the pinnacle of American design and manufacture, all it needs is some TLC. I had to buy three dividing heads on e rape before I had all the parts to make a satisfactory dividing head for my #2 Universal light type milling machine; a person just has to accept the fact that nothing in this world is perfect and one must expend some effort to have something that approaches perfection. In my mind there are two manufacturers that came closest to that ideal; B&S for one, and Pratt & Whitney for another; both date back to the beginnings of industrial excellence in this country.
 

BROCKWOOD

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#32
I agree this is a worthy candidate for restoration benmychree! Still don't have my mini endmills, but did buy the other 2 indexing plates & have my eye on a few tailstocks. Any chance you could take pics of your indexing gearset? I'm curious of as to what the hole diameters are & of what the mounting brackets measure to. Thanks for all your input everyone!
 
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benmychree

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#33
I agree this is a worthy candidate for restoration benmychree! Still don't hamy mini endmills, but did buy the other 2 indexing plates & have my eye on a few tailstocks. Any chance you could take pics of your indexing gearset? I'm curious of as to what the hole diameters are & of what the mounting brackets measure to. Thanks for all your input everyone!
I will do that in the next few days The hole diameter on all the change gears is 1". It seems that most of the gear sets stayed with the machine itself in the compartment in the machine base.
 

BROCKWOOD

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#34
Mini end mills came in. 5/64 - 9/64. But 12 hour shift begs me to wait until tomorrow night to begin using them.

20170611_100605560.jpg
 

benmychree

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#35
Mini end mills came in. 5/64 - 9/64. But 12 hour shift begs me to wait until tomorrow night to begin using them.

View attachment 235306
I have sketches made of the gear mounting brackets and the shaft that drives the change gears when doing differential indexing; it replaces the center that normally is used in the spindle hole and I also found a drawing of a crank handle that fits over the dividing head crank that is handy when doing rotary milling with the dividing head; I saw one in a B&S publication but have never seen one as a catalog item.
Rather than try to scan the drawings, I'd rather send them to you through the mail; E Mail me at york@napanet.net with your mailing address.
 

BROCKWOOD

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#36
Index stop pin (702) cleaned up very nicely with a 3/32" end mill. Works good as new! I wasn't happy with the spring I had picked for Spindle Stop (707) so beehived the end of a stronger spring & that works much better. Now the detent spring for the Spindle Stop Lever (706) will take some figuring & a better 'bullet'. Just about ready to blow this thing apart for some restoring!!! Also, have the other 2 index plates & some of the gear train coming soon. Looks like this dividing head will be making it's own gears.

20170613 01.jpg
20170613 02.jpg
 
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BROCKWOOD

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#37
New parts came in today! I thank John for his help. Packing on the index plates is over the top. The 1 on the left, however, has all the holes too small. It's a start. Idler gear / bracket & crank handle though, awesome!!

20170614 10.jpg
 

benmychree

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#38
Do you have a copy of B&S "Practical Treatise on Milling and Milling Machines"? It is a must have item; today my project was graduating a 12" blacksmith's brass hook rule; it is done by gearing the dividing head spindle to the mill table as illustrated in the aforementioned book, and in the case of the rule I made is graduated in 1/16" graduations, 12" long made of 1/8" brass with a handle at one end and a hook on the other; for 1/16" graduations it takes about 5 min. per inch of graduations, 10 turns of the worm shaft being required for that interval. I hope to take and post some pictures of the operations.
Brockwood, I'm happy to see that the items arrived in good order; after I sent them off I found two of the washer faced bolts that hold the idler gear and compound gear brackets on the dividing head and end of table, but they need to be threaded back a little more to be usable and they do not have the screwdriver slot on the face of the hex as the originals do; I will LUK if it is possible to modify them, or you can of course make your own from the sketches I sent you.
 

BROCKWOOD

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#39
Yes I do have a copy of B&S "Practical Treatise on Milling and Milling Machines". I am slowly soaking it up. Your job sounds much more interesting than mine. But, at home I get to see what I can come up with while restoring some neat old equipment! I didn't get the letter yet (just the package), so I'm sure to elaborate more when it comes.
 

BROCKWOOD

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#40
I now know that I need a set of 14P gear cutters for either a 1" or 1.250" arbor to cut my gears!
 

benmychree

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#41
I may have at least some of the 14P cutters extra, although likely cutters that small would have 7/8" arbor hole; I'll have a look. Wouldn't you like to have every accessory for your mill seen in the B&S book?
Besides the dividing head, I have the slotting head and most of the rack milling attachment and the short lead attachment.
 

BROCKWOOD

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#42
I better pull in my reins just a tad. Just adding a NMTB50 7/8" arbor to this is............
I haven't even finished my drawbar or run power to my mill. Seems senseless to be worried about an indexing head while in process of sorting out the mill. Often a smaller project such as the B&S 2 will fill the time while ramping up to the bigger projects. I am such a newb though. At present I am not trying to be focused on any 1 project or goal. What is currently at hand? I have to get an Aloris type of quick change. Then I can get the center bore completed on my drawbar nut. It's an old axiom: put it in service & you will never have time to get it set up the way you envisioned. Drawbar, Dividing Head, Tail Stock, Sump Pump (& attachments), The overhead stop/start arm. Lots to do. I refuse to be overwhelmed. In the pic are the 2 parts of my drawbar. The bushing part fits beautifully. On the B&S2 The (706) Spindle Stop needs better than what I tried, so I wrestled up an old brass bolt to make my 'bullet' from.

IMG_20170614_191356245.jpg
 

benmychree

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#44
Yes. it would; anything worth doing is worth doing to excess! Seriously, 'tho, I doubt it is possible to accomplish; so many accessories, so little time!
 

benmychree

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#45
Since this forum features a specific dividing head, the Brown & Sharpe Universal, I thought the following pictures of a graduating job using the dividing head to space the graduations being cut into a brass blacksmith's hook rule that I just made for a local artist blacksmith, Lowell Chaput, of Rohnert Park Ca. As can be seen in the pictures, the dividing head spindle is geared to the table screw and the worm shaft is rotated 10 turns to equal graduations of 1/16" and each graduation is cut in turn using a sharply pointed tool held in the fly cutter arbor, the spindle being prevented from any turning by the flat bar clamped against the overarm support; the length of the graduations is determined by four lines scribed on the brass blank and a rule is laid behind the one being cut to remind me which length lines to scribe in turn, the saddle hand feed is used to do the scribing; using this setup, it took approximately five minutes to graduate each inch of the rule, After graduation is complete, the burrs are removed with abrasive cloth, the inch number markings and the owner's name are engraved with my Gorton 3-U engraver; I used a "Roman" font for the numbers, and the "Spencer" font for the owner's name
 

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benmychree

John York
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#46
Incidentally, the extra long crank on the dividing head was a B&S item, but I have never seen it in a catalog, I just happened on a picture in a B&S book on screw machines, where it was used to provide more leverage when rotary milling of cams for the screw machines; I had a number of them laser cut with a view to sell them on E Bay, but never got around to it; If anyone wants one, I will sell them for $15 each plus postage. Contact me at york@napanet.net The large hole is so that the device may be slipped over the index plunger knob, and the long slot is so that the index crank may be used in any hole circle with the device in place.
 

benmychree

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#48
I was hoping to see your ruler setup! I'm happy with my laser cut handle.
I was pretty proud of the fact that I was able to take and post the pictures without my wife's help! Maybe I just got lucky! Practically any odd graduation can be made down to infinitely tiny ones using that setup and the tables in "Practical Treatise on Milling and Milling Machines" by B&S. Incidentally, B&S made an automatic graduating machine I think in the late 1850s, which was given by them to the Smithsonian in the mid 1960s, noting it had been in use in their plant for over one hundred years; what that statement did not say was that there were still a bunch of them STILL running in their plant much later. These machines did not cut actual graduations (I think), but just scribed through an acid resist, and the actual graduations were, at least for the most part were acid etched as they are for machinists and patternmaker's rules.
 

BROCKWOOD

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#49
Finally got the Spindle Stop Pin Pinion (706) hot enough to allow the set screw for the handle to come on out (no part numbers for these 2 parts). The only logical reason for the handle to be mounted from the wrong side is that the rack & pinion (707 & 706) were not meshing smoothly. Even with a stiffer spring set on the 2 parts, this feature was not working as it should. By turning the pinion (706) 180 degrees out of phase, it must have been hoped that the lever action would be smooth again. With careful deburring & polishing that lever action is just about as it should be: decisive & positive. Once these parts are smooth & functioning properly, should I just go ahead & completely blue them for rust prevention & hardness?

20170616_200226542.jpg
 

benmychree

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#50
I think the original blackish finish of B&S parts was niter bluing; a 50/50 mixture of sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate was heated (and melted to a clear liquid) to 600 deg. F. for only perhaps 5 minutes; color desired can range from blue to black depending on time in the bath; this the U.S. Armory method of bluing. Just heating to blue does not provide nearly the same protection from rusting.
My B&S dividing head does not seem to have a spring behind the plunger, but I have not looked to see if it had one or if it is there and broken; keeping the plunger engaged on the rapid indexing plate under cutting conditions does not seem to be a problem, as the slight taper of the plunger and hole in the plate hold quite tightly when engaged; also I do not note any evidence of the detent bullet in the "feel" of the plunger when engaging or dis engaging the plunger, perhaps I need to take it apart and have a look?
Somewhere on Hobby Machinist, I posted the entire American Machinist technical article on U.S. Armory method of bluing ( with express permission of American Machinist) It bears reading if you can find it. I had a B&S #2 universal mill of about 1906 vintage; I used it in my machine shop for about 30 years, then restored it to take with me in retirement; well, along came a 1942 model with more features and the universal milling attachment ( all angles), so I sold my restored machine, but as part of the restoration, I blackened all the bare steel parts for rust protection as they were originally and it really does a good job at preventing rust. It works on cast iron too, but it takes much longer and does not give the intense black finish as it does with steel. Chemical "gun blue" is nearly worthless for rust protection and the selenium based "cold black" solutions are also quite poor. The only drawback to the Armory method and the "torch blue" methods is that both draw the temper of hardened articles to the "spring temper" level, that is, I think, in the high 30s Rockwell C range of hardness.
 

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#51
The Direct Indexing Pin is clocked just right for the latch 'bullet' to catch. The added springs do aid in the turning. It feels much better now, so the handle received a good polishing.

IMG_20170618_203652815.jpg

Our mystery bolt in the Worm Shaft Adjusting Screw (703) turned out to be another Zert type grease fitting with the nipple milled off. Perhaps this was a good idea on paper that went south?

IMG_20170618_203617661.jpg
 
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BROCKWOOD

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#52
Keith Rucker shows disassembly / function & adjustment of various parts / reassembly of an early clone of the B&S 2 in the link below. In it he mentions that his direct indexing pin lever has 2 detents - engaged & disengaged. Of course he doesn't take that apart. This was my reason for starting this thread: addressing the parts that get taken for granted. In part 1 the Simple Indexing Lock Pin was reviewed & repaired. Now, in part 2 the direct indexing pin assembly is disassembled, examined & corrections implemented successfully. I have my disengage detent working pretty good as it holds the direct indexing pin back against the pressure of the engage spring that is directly behind the direct indexing pin. This part 3 will be about the Worm Shaft Adjusting Screw assembly - nobody ever takes it apart. Pic 1 above shows a dark column of grease ejected from the Zert grease passage. It also shows that the handles for the main body lock & the simple indexing lock are swapped. Waiting on an Allen Wrench that fits the replacement lock screw to correct that.

Keith's link:
 

BROCKWOOD

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#53
Wondering what to do about this. Thinking about welding up the slot, reslotting & trying out the zert. What would you do?
IMG_20170620_010629752.jpg IMG_20170620_011443503.jpg IMG_20170620_011513347.jpg
 

BROCKWOOD

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#55
So, I listened. Put all that part back together & tuned it all in just fine. This is the more modern version with the roller / thrust bearings. Though I tried, I have No clue of how to break it down as far as you see in videos of the earlier design. I think the key to getting it all completely broken down lies in the removal of the Spindle Clamp Screw Plug (2060). Here it is now:
20170624_073615970.jpg

It is very easy to take offense when told to just leave it alone. I work with electrical equipment measuring up to 500KV to supply power to a thriving community. Some have lost limb & some have lost life (thankfully, not on my watch). Whether electrical or mechanical: these forces we are dealing with do not take prisoners. The fact that results are permanent has to be present in every operation. In my business we each reserve the right to stop any & all work until any doubt concerning the results is resolved. Here: I got stopped. Appreciated! I hope to learn why.

Not happy with the Worm Shaft Adjusting Screw (703), but will worry with making another later. The front gear guard is just about polished & all that is left is cleaning up the Spiral Gear Guard (2052).
 

brino

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#56
There are many ways to say it:

Don't let perfection stand in the way of good enough.

Confucius: Better a diamond with a flaw than a pebble without.
Shakespeare: striving to better, oft we mar what's well
Shakespeare: Were it not sinful then, striving to mend, To mar the subject that before was well?

Satisficing: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Satisficing

I believe that knowing when to stop is a tough lesson.
Like when to quit spray painting before you get a drip/run, even though you want to finish it today. (my most recent personal example...from today!)

-brino
 

4gsr

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#57
So, I listened. Put all that part back together & tuned it all in just fine. This is the more modern version with the roller / thrust bearings. Though I tried, I have No clue of how to break it down as far as you see in videos of the earlier design. I think the key to getting it all completely broken down lies in the removal of the Spindle Clamp Screw Plug (2060). Here it is now:
View attachment 236251

It is very easy to take offense when told to just leave it alone. I work with electrical equipment measuring up to 500KV to supply power to a thriving community. Some have lost limb & some have lost life (thankfully, not on my watch). Whether electrical or mechanical: these forces we are dealing with do not take prisoners. The fact that results are permanent has to be present in every operation. In my business we each reserve the right to stop any & all work until any doubt concerning the results is resolved. Here: I got stopped. Appreciated! I hope to learn why.

Not happy with the Worm Shaft Adjusting Screw (703), but will worry with making another later. The front gear guard is just about polished & all that is left is cleaning up the Spiral Gear Guard (2052).
Yeah, I know, I said to leave it alone.

Will say, you knew what you were doing, and you did a superb job on rebuilding your dividing head!

I eat my words!

Thanks for sharing
 

BROCKWOOD

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#58
The 2052 Spiral Gear Guard was originally painted. Black or gray could have been correct - I don't know. Those are the only 2 colors I found when cleaning it up. I went with Winter Gray (which doesn't seem to be correct for anything I have).
20170802_115602391.jpg
 
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