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Bronze powder Epoxy slurry

Discussion in 'MACHINE RESTORATION & WAY SCRAPING' started by cathead, Feb 14, 2017.

  1. mws

    mws Active User Active Member

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    At the risk of getting myself in trouble here but... I cringe when I read about using various filler materials embedded in magical compounds to produce bearing surfaces. The idea that two materials bearing on each other, regardless of their lubricious properties is completely antithetical to what should be accomplished. To wit, creating as large as possible parallel (congruent for cylinders) planes which glide on a thin film of lubricant. The solution to that has historically been scraping to produce a flat plane as well as the numerous pockets to retain oil. Only when the parts cease to move should they settle into contact. The instant they move, those pockets should deliver oil between the surfaces and NO contact should exist.
    That being said, the hardness of the surface, ie: cast iron, epoxy, etc, should be such to resist embedding of particulates, resulting in a lapping surface. If you examine the various formulations of Turcite or Rulon, or even Moglice, these are relatively soft materials but resist embedding. Many claims are made for various products but I've seldom seen thorough engineering studies (the kind with real numbers) on their long term functionality. Moglice is probably the best in terms of publishing some hard data on their product's characteristics.
    Moglice also suggests a minimum thickness to be applied. This makes sense to me as a varied surface of different materials seems problematic to me, but I conjecture. I would think spot applications of some product may suffice to prevent loss of lubrication through some gouge or clearance, but would not likely produce a bearing surface of desirable quality.
    I have rebuilt a number of small machine ways, and taken Richard King's class. Having only used turcite once on a grinder bed I'm certainly no expert. But what experience I have has shown me that the old rules are not ameliorated by modern magic elixirs and synthetics. Those rules, as stated earlier, are simple. Scraped parallel planes, lots of little contact points and oil retention pockets. Preventing surface to surface contact is paramount!
    Mark S.
     
    vtcnc, Bob Korves and rrjohnso2000 like this.
  2. EmilioG

    EmilioG United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I've done this many times using clear polyester resin and 300 mesh fine bronze powder.
    You could try using 5 minute epoxy or West systems epoxy, but the resin must be clear. JB Weld is opaque and will not
    give you a true bronze look. The more bronze powder that you load into the resin the better. Build a clay dam because the material will run.,
    or make a mold from GE clear silicone.
     
  3. Tozguy

    Tozguy Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    In my experience, industrial stuff works better than hobby stuff. I am all for experimenting if that is the objective in itself. But if the objective is to make the best repair possible then trying to outsmart the 'pros' might not get you there. Belzona must be used a lot if it only sells in large formats. Is it a 'cry once' opportunity?
     
  4. Tozguy

    Tozguy Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    It sounds like it cuts well. Any more you can tell us about it?
     

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