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Atlas xy table question

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calstar

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#1
Got a 1974 12x36 lathe a few weeks ago, my first lathe, and have an Atlas 7x7 xy axis table I picked up a few years ago for use on my dp. I've read where this can be attached to the cross slide, anyone know where I can see a picture of one mounted on the lathe? thanks, Brian
 

Uncle Buck

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#2
Got a 1974 12x36 lathe a few weeks ago, my first lathe, and have an Atlas 7x7 xy axis table I picked up a few years ago for use on my dp. I've read where this can be attached to the cross slide, anyone know where I can see a picture of one mounted on the lathe? thanks, Brian
I do not recall where I have seen pictures, but I know you are correct about this. I have seen pics and read about this being done. In fact now that I think about it I think there was a picture of this in an old Atlas products catalog that I currently have loaned to a friend. I seem to recall the only part of the 7x 7 they used doing this was the top and the clamps.

Sorry I cannot provide the pic you request.
 

Tonym47

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#5
Help me out guys I can't see how you would use that table on a lathe. You only have 2 axis X-Y what about Z what am I missing?
 

Uncle Buck

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#6
Forgive my ignorance, but is the Z axis the one that would allow the table to raise in height to allow for centering work on its table to the chuck? I have the same table and lathe myself and see little in the way of utility depicted in the setup shown above. That is unfortunate because I have a job I would love to do with this setup, but will not since it would appear from the picture there is no way I could center the work secured to the table to be on center with tooling rotating at the chuck.
 

calstar

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#7
Help me out guys I can't see how you would use that table on a lathe. You only have 2 axis X-Y what about Z what am I missing?
Having not yet used the lathe or the table with it I was thinking the same thing. I originally posted this so I could see how it is used but now I don't see how it can bedue to the lack of a z axis adjustment. I'm pretty sure I read somewhere that it could be used as a "boring" table(what I was hoping to discover) on the lathe but......

Brian
 

Privateer

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#8
In the case of a boring operation, I would posit that the item to be bored would be mounted in the vise, and moved into position using the saddle and cross slide. While the standard milling attachment has the Z-axis ability, it wouldn't necessarily be able to handle larger pieces or items that might have to be bolted down. An example might be boring out a small engine block for a cam shaft. All in all, I would find it a handy item to have in my inventory.

Terry
 

wa5cab

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#9
The table off of the Atlas or Craftsman X-Y table does, as shown in the photo several posts below, fit onto the pintle of the cross slide in place of the compound. The table also fits on the milling attachment in place of the vise (where I have used mine several times). There is a photo of this table being used as a boring table on a 10" lathe in the 40's and early 50's MOLO.

Atlas actually made and sold two heavier boring tables for the lathe that mount in place of the cross slide. I have only actually ever seen one of each, and got out-bid on both. They looked somewhat like the main component of the cross carriage turret, except that all of the T-slots run in the same direction.

The Z-axis movement is achieved by shimming. Not very convenient for one-off projects but OK for production.

Robert D.
 

wwunder

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#10
...The table also fits on the milling attachment in place of the vise (where I have used mine several times)...Robert D.
That IMO would be a great use of the table. I have the milling attachment and have found the vise to be difficult to set up and limited in what it can hold.
 

oldgoaly

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#11
doah! I've had them for 20 years and did not know it would fit the lathe! :thinking:
have use the milling attachment many times it is a very useful and well ade.
 

MikeBanak

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#12
Got a 1974 12x36 lathe a few weeks ago, my first lathe, and have an Atlas 7x7 xy axis table I picked up a few years ago for use on my dp. I've read where this can be attached to the cross slide, anyone know where I can see a picture of one mounted on the lathe? thanks, Brian
Yes, just take off the compound slide and the xy table top fits were the compound was. loosen up the two set screws on tthe compound that allows the compound to rotate.
 

Round in circles

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#13
Aw shucks! There you go , you guys have got me all hot & bothered at the thought of owning such a bit of gear . One day if not here on earth but in the other place I'll go to I'll have one .
 

Randall Marx

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#14
This sounds REALLY GREAT! Wonder if I can find something like these before I die. (not that I plan to die soon, of course)
 
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