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4

Atlas 24" Scroll Saw - #4003

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Chipper5783

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#1
I am really not sure if this post should be in "Atlas" machines, Antiques or Saws. Anyway, a pretty nice running good sized scroll saw. The motor has a patent date of 1937. It came to me via "a friend of a friend" connection. This fellow needed some small parts made for an obsolete machine. Without the parts, his machine was not functional.

It was the usual story that if I were to charge $1/hr - then it probably wouldn't be worth it (some of these fiddly little items can take quite a bit of time). My usual charge out price is "future considerations" and I usually end up with a new friend. About a year went by, the previous owner is now needing to reduce his shop and gave me a call. The saw I'd fixed is now in my workshop.

So the quest now begins to try to track down other owners, look for documentation - because I think the blade alignment is off (probably because of the blade chuck I made). I don't think the pulley's are correct (seems too fast). How was the guard set up? If anyone else has one of these, could they provide me pictures of the lower blade chuck and the belt drive and any documentation they are able to share.

Regards, David
 

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Charles Spencer

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#2
What information is on the data plate? It's not legible in your picture. It's quite possible that there is a Craftsman version with documentation readily available.
 

Chipper5783

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#3
Model is 4003 Serial number is 00243

I would like to use it for contour sawing metal.
 

Dave Smith

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#4
David---this saw is for wood---you could use it for cutting 1/4" aluminum or maybe thin sheet metal with a blade for metal if you slow down the speed ---it won't cut fast like a bandsaw but may work---you will need to lower the blade guide to just close above the metal you are cutting----put the smallest pulley you can on the motor shaft and the largest pulley you can on the saw ----1725 rpm or slower motor if you have one----Dave
 

wa5cab

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#5
The only Atlas Woodworking catalog that I seem to have is from Nov 1954. It shows the Model 4002. From which I would guess that your 4003 is from 1955 or later. Otherwise, the catalog photos look pretty much like yours except for the stand. Unfortunately, I don't have a parts list on either model.

The patent number on the motor doesn't aid in dating it.
 

tomh

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#7
look at the sears catalogs 1930/40s on owwm they listed a variety of files to fit those scroll saws to use them as a small die filler, there is also copy's of the owner/parts manual there as well .
 

wa5cab

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#8
The date on the 4001/4021 manual is 1950. I looked through the Sears power tools catalogs from 1949 through 1963 and found nothing that looks like the Atlas jig saws. My conclusion is that Sears never sold the Atlas jig saws.

Also, the blade jaws on the 4001 do not look like the jaws on the 4002 and probably 4003. The jaw assembly on the 4001 is sorta rectangular and the manual does not mention mounting the blade in line with the main frame for normal sawing or at right angles to it for ripping a long work piece. The photo of the lower jaw in the 1954 Atlas catalog is round, has two set screws, and appears to have a 4-piece jaw assembly. As it mentions holding files, probably there are two slightly different sets of jaws.

The 4001/4021 manual does not define or mention differences between the two models. But my guess is that one was sold with and the other one one without the motor.
 

VSAncona

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#9
The 4002/4003/4004 jig saws are all essentially the same saw, except for the drive unit. The base saw is the 4003 and it came without any drive or motor pulleys. If you purchased it with the pair of 4-step pulleys, it became the 4002. If purchased with the variable-speed drive unit, it was sold as the 4004. But the base saws are identical.
 

wa5cab

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#10
OK. Thanks for that. Too bad that the only manual that has so far turned up is on the 4001, which has at least one obvious difference (the blade chucks).
 
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