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Anyone experienced in Acme (Automotive) Shanks

Discussion in 'QUESTIONS & ANSWERS (Get Help Fast Here!)' started by lwburnham, Aug 3, 2017.

  1. lwburnham

    lwburnham United States Active User Active Member

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    City:
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    A while back I posted some pictures in this thread

    http://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/help-id-this-tooling.55305/#post-462419

    asking for help identifying some tooling I had purchased at an auction. One of my big things was, what type of shank was in the photos and what type of machine was it used in. I did know that the gentleman who's estate was being auctioned off, was a retired machinist from the automotive industry (Navistar in Indianapolis to be exact), so it made sense when I learned that it was known as an Automotive Shank.

    Apparently it goes by several other names also. Acme Shank, Auto Shank, or Adjustable Adapter Shank. I learned all this info here on page 10.

    http://www.tools-n-gizmos.com/specs/Tapers.html

    So that still leaves the burning question. What Brand and/or model of machinery was this taper used in? Is there anyone on here that is in the automotive industry or have relatives that were 20-30 years ago? Maybe this stuff is still used, but I highly doubt it.

    I have a drawer full of this stuff and would like to find it a home or find a machine somewhere that I can buy to use with it.

    Thanks

    - Lanny
     
  2. 4gsr

    4gsr Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    The machines that used this type of tooling was very specialized to the automotive industry. Primarily for building engine and transmission components. I don't know of any other industry that used this type of tooling that I'm aware of. And no, there are no manual built machines that used this tooling either. Not even adapters to adapt to existing machines. The tooling is pretty much obsolete. Put it with you next run of junk to the scrap yard and sell it for what you can get for it. Sorry.
     
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  3. lwburnham

    lwburnham United States Active User Active Member

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    Thanks for the response. I'm curious if you had some more details on the machinery. Can you tell me a Brand/name/model of a piece of machinery that would have used this shank? I realize that it is scrap and something that I'll never be able to use, but I would like to be able to research this further and I'm not having much luck.

    Thanks
     
  4. 4gsr

    4gsr Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I've only seen a few pictures. Might try New Britain Machine tool, Sundstrand, Kingsbury, for a start. Most of the manufactures that made this type of equipment we have never heard of. Most were engineering companies that specialized in this type of equipment. Most of these companies are long gone, too, so you are not going to find much on them. If you do, that will be great. Let us know what you find out. I like to know too. Ken
     
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  5. francist

    francist Canada Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Just did a quick poke at a search. Here's a link to some info about Sundstrand Machine Tool. Looks like they made adding machines, but also mentioned (I think around 1924) is a "stub lathe" that they developed and which became very popular in automotive and farm equipment manufacturing plants. Hmmm...

    http://www.schoepski.com/states/illinois/sundstrand/sundstrand.htm

    Good lead Ken!

    -frank
     
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  6. lwburnham

    lwburnham United States Active User Active Member

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    Ah.....good info guys. I will keep digging and report back!

    - Lanny
     
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