1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. PLEASE: Read the FORUM RULES BEFORE registering!

    Dismiss Notice

[CNC] Anilam 3200mk Help

Discussion in 'CNC IN THE HOME SHOP' started by 95ttoplt1, Jan 16, 2016.

  1. 95ttoplt1

    95ttoplt1 United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    18
    City:
    clarksville
    State:
    Tennessee

    -Return to Top-

    Yes, that looks way better. Your key pad seems to be a different style as well.

    How are you programming it? on the machine? or with CAD and transferring on a floppy?
     
  2. 95ttoplt1

    95ttoplt1 United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    18
    City:
    clarksville
    State:
    Tennessee

    -Return to Top-

    Well I went to fire it up and play with it today and got all the messages for the battery being dead which was expected. What wasn't expected is that no one carries it and I had to order one. Dead in the water until Friday.

    In the mean time, I noticed my screen under "machine" it only lists the two axis, as that what it was set up for. What is needed software/controller wise to add the Z? Will I be able to add a 4th axis after that? I'm trying to decide if this is worth working the kinks out of, or start to build a more modifiable controller.
     
  3. JimDawson

    JimDawson Global Moderator Staff Member Director

    Likes Received:
    3,714
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Sandy
    State:
    Oregon

    -Return to Top-

    That is a tough question. What I did is run mine with the 2 axis controller until I got used to it, and CNC in general. I started knowing nothing about CNC, but have a lot of experience in motion control systems. In the meantime I ordered in all the parts to build a new controller. When the Anilam controller finally failed, I did the upgrade.......right in the middle of a production run. I was up and running again in a day and a half. Finished that job, then started working on the Z axis parts.
     
    psychodelicdan and 95ttoplt1 like this.
  4. derf

    derf Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    259
    Trophy Points:
    63
    City:
    Delphos
    State:
    Ohio

    -Return to Top-

    I'd agree with Jim, run it as 2 axis till you get it down pat, then upgrade. You can program it from the console, or from your desk top and transfer via a floppy( if you can find floppies anymore) You can also transfer programs via a RS 232 cable, but I haven't figured that out yet. I have the off line software for my desktop, but....you don't really need it, as you can write the program in notepad. It's all text. If it's like mine, there is a DFX converter in the OS. It will also convert G code to a point.
     
    psychodelicdan and 95ttoplt1 like this.
  5. 95ttoplt1

    95ttoplt1 United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    18
    City:
    clarksville
    State:
    Tennessee

    -Return to Top-

    Do you still have the old controller? I found HH Roberts and they have a link explaining that 3200 vs 3300 is one I/O card. I looked and sure enough my board has three slots, and cards only in two. Could it really be as easy as adding another card and updating the software and adding Anilam Z servo set up?

    I am getting excited to get it off the trailer, I'm about 25% through my shop upgrade(foam insulation,plywood walls). My health hasn't been cooperating lately so its slow going. I have been watching all the videos I can on it, and just general milling. I'm glad I got even a simple two axis. Little things, like radius cuts, milling holes etc. Since I don't have a rotary table yet.

    I did download the offline software, but it wont run on this 64 but machine. I'll have to see if I have a old laptop that will work.


    EDIT: Jim, do you know where the VGA into the CRT would be, or what it would look like? I see a couple VGA ports on one of the cards, but nothing is hooked to them?
     
  6. JimDawson

    JimDawson Global Moderator Staff Member Director

    Likes Received:
    3,714
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Sandy
    State:
    Oregon

    -Return to Top-

    No, I actually sold it on ebay as soon as I finished the upgrade. Had it listed as not working for $250, sold in about 10 minutes!

    You might try a VGA monitor in one of the ports. It could be that they have the monitor connected as RGB, so it might have 3 separate cables going to it.
     
  7. 95ttoplt1

    95ttoplt1 United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    18
    City:
    clarksville
    State:
    Tennessee

    -Return to Top-

    Dang. This might be worth selling as operational then.

    I'll try the monitor tomorrow or Friday and report back.
     
  8. JimDawson

    JimDawson Global Moderator Staff Member Director

    Likes Received:
    3,714
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Sandy
    State:
    Oregon

    -Return to Top-

    One caution! Make sure those are actually VGA ports. There is a lot of industrial equipment that uses HD connectors for other stuff, that old, they are probably VGA but you never know. :cautious: It would suck to fry something if they are for something else.
     
  9. 95ttoplt1

    95ttoplt1 United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    18
    City:
    clarksville
    State:
    Tennessee

    -Return to Top-

    True. I'll post a picture of the port and card tomorrow
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2016
  10. 95ttoplt1

    95ttoplt1 United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    18
    City:
    clarksville
    State:
    Tennessee

    -Return to Top-

    Well another baby step forward. I started today taking pictures of the card and found the answer to my question.

    20160204_071723.jpg

    20160204_071754.jpg
    20160204_071812.jpg
    20160204_071830.jpg
    20160204_071908.jpg
    20160204_071905.jpg
    20160204_071851.jpg
    20160204_071841.jpg




    This is where my dim bulb lit up. I looked on the other side of where it said VGA and sure enough that is where I had a small cable connected that ran into the CRT box.

    20160204_071913.jpg
    20160204_071918.jpg

    I put the card back in, and hooked my desktop monitor up to the VGA port and..

    20160204_072535.jpg

    Success! This is much better than a crappy fuzzy CRT. Now just waiting on the battery to arrive and looking for a cheap monitor. Although, I do have a 42 inch LED TV in the shop with a VGA in. I might do some re arranging and set up a little CNC programming station in front of the TV.

    I am starting to be a little leery of the system though. I cant remember the last time I saw a 486 CPU. While I'm sure its adequate for what it does, it seems like a step above a abacus in terms of computing power and certainly would seem easy to overwhelm.

    So other little thoughts going forward to make it more user friendly(after looking over websites of companies that repair these). Input and opinions requested

    1: Adding a card reader.
    2. Adding the third axis
    3. using that Ethernet port on the card to integrate into the home network( I don't have a computer with a RS432 port)
    4. Would option 3 allow it to run Wifi in some form? That would open it way up. Cell phone control etc..

    What is the "feature connector?

    What is the Flat Panel connector?

    As you can see I'm not a real computer genius, but this has been a fun learning experience so far. Thanks all for the help!
     

    Attached Files:

  11. JimDawson

    JimDawson Global Moderator Staff Member Director

    Likes Received:
    3,714
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Sandy
    State:
    Oregon

    -Return to Top-

    You might be a bit shocked at the pricing on the repairs and upgrades to the existing hardware. I think I would go in a different direction, especially because you are dealing with 25 year old technology.

    If you can find a serial (RS232) card reader and old DOS drivers for it, it might work. If the existing software will support it.

    If you can find the software to run it, the system was designed to run 3 axis

    I don't think that the E-net port exists on that card. There is the space for it but I'm guessing it's not enabled in firmware. It may be possible to add it. Finding drivers might be a challenge. Not something I would do.

    I think you would have to add a Windows based computer to the system and use that to communicate with the controller computer.

    I dunno

    I suspect they had an option for some kind of a auxiliary operator panel. Normally these are RS232 or RS485 serial devices. Maybe some kind of a touch screen device.

    The existing software probably supports serial communications so I would add a more modern computer and use that as the gateway for the external communications. Then just pass the G-code to the Anilam computer. You can pick up an older Windows computer with a serial port for almost nothing or many times for free. Setting up the comms might be an interesting project. Again this would require some compatible terminal software on the Windows computer, I don't know if Hyper Terminal (installed as part of Windows) would work or not. For longer programs, it might require that a drip system be set up. That is where an outside device loads G-code as the controller computer will take it.

    If you want, I give my software away for free. But it will only work with Galil Motion Control products. If you want to do that upgrade I can help you out. But I recommend that you use what you have first to get familiar with CNC and writing G-code in conversational mode from the screen.
    .
    .
     
    95ttoplt1 likes this.
  12. derf

    derf Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    259
    Trophy Points:
    63
    City:
    Delphos
    State:
    Ohio

    -Return to Top-

    About 2 years ago I had to replace the x axis drive card on mine and it was $600.00. At the same time, they were offering upgrades for a SD card readers and that conversion was $750.00, and had to be installed by them at the factory. The network feature was already there, but it took $500.00 to "unlock" it. As far as adding another axis, at the time I got mine, a 4th axis was about $8000 with the rotary table.I would suspect a z axis would be less, but it will depend on the type of motion it takes to make it work.
     
    95ttoplt1 and JimDawson like this.
  13. 95ttoplt1

    95ttoplt1 United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    18
    City:
    clarksville
    State:
    Tennessee

    -Return to Top-

    Thanks Fellas.

    I got a $25 19" Dell LED monitor today for it. I'll just piggy back it for now and leave the CRT in the housing.

    I did cruise around Ebay and found tons of cards. I'll have to do more research and see what adding the Z will all entail. Just getting it up and running 2 axis will be fun enough haha.

    I did find a offering of a manual that has the wiring diagrams and such, but they wanted I think close to $400 for a downloadable PDF. Is there a copy of this floating around somewhere?

    This will probably show my ignorance, but controller wise, to add the third axis. Could it be as simple as adding a third card or replacing the card in the controller, and loading up 3300 software? Its seems that if its any more than that, I would be money ahead to part out this controller, and build my own?

    Jim I certainly appreciate the offer of the software. I have to warn you I will be less than useless as a beta tester though haha. The long paragraph about running a windows computer to drip and all that is way over my head(I even stood on my chair, no luck).

    I wish I had a wiring diagram to look at, or my mill unwrapped and in the shop. I'm sure more of this would make sense. I need to check out all the motors and such any way.

    I see why your controller disappeared at $250 on ebay. I saw just a front panel no screen for $450!! cards are 300-800 each. Crazyness.

    If you fellas wind up in the Nashville Tennessee area I owe you a beer.
     
  14. JimDawson

    JimDawson Global Moderator Staff Member Director

    Likes Received:
    3,714
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Sandy
    State:
    Oregon

    -Return to Top-

    I just wanted it out of my shop, it was useless to me. It was either ebay or the trash.

    I don't know why people are trying to repair these old systems. It's too easy to upgrade using modern equipment. Actually there haven't really been a lot of changes in computers in the last five years or so, just a few of the peripherals have gotten faster. It use to be that by the time you carried your new computer out of the store it was obsolete, not so much any more.

    It will be fun to see your mill set up and running. Can't wait 'till into the shop.
    .
    .
     
  15. 95ttoplt1

    95ttoplt1 United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    18
    City:
    clarksville
    State:
    Tennessee

    -Return to Top-

    Jim,

    Just for giggles. I found a computer locally windows based for $40. key board monitor and all. What would I need assuming all the components outside the control are good? I see all these cards online, but I don't understand how it all works. Do I just buy one of those cards, and wire it in to the inside of the computer? Then run the wires from there out to the machine?

    This is the cart running over the horse at this point, but I'm curious.
     
  16. JimDawson

    JimDawson Global Moderator Staff Member Director

    Likes Received:
    3,714
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Sandy
    State:
    Oregon

    -Return to Top-

    Well, kinda. I just took a desktop computer, cut the case in half and stuffed the back half into the control cabinet. That way all of the wiring is inside the cabinet. You could do a neater job, but I was in a hurry. Go here and scroll about 2/3 of the way down http://www.dawsoncontrols.com/millupgrade.html
    The green terminal block is the main connection between the card and the world, connects with a 100 pin cable.

    Galil has two different different styles of devices. One is the PCI bus card that goes in a standard desktop computer, the other is a metal cased stand alone unit that connects to the computer via Ethernet, serial or USB. Both do the same job, and have about the same specs. All are available in 1 to 8 axes. I am running a DMC-1846 4 axis PCI card in both my mill and router. In the case of the router, I did just what you described and the computer sits loose on top of the control cabinet and the cable runs into the cabinet.

    If I were going to build a new system, I would use one of the new mini computers, about the size of a brick. In fact I am putting together two of those systems right now for a customer project. Using a Galil DMC-30017 1 axis motion controller with on-board stepper drive. It's a little bigger than a pack of cigarettes.
    .
    .
     
  17. derf

    derf Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    259
    Trophy Points:
    63
    City:
    Delphos
    State:
    Ohio

    -Return to Top-

    This might give you an idea why they want $400.00 for a manual....... manual.jpg

    This thing is 3-1/2" thick and weighs 10 lbs. It does have wiring schematics, but the prints are 11" x 17", and I don't have a copier that big.
     
    95ttoplt1 and JimDawson like this.
  18. 95ttoplt1

    95ttoplt1 United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    18
    City:
    clarksville
    State:
    Tennessee

    -Return to Top-

    well I made a little progress. I hired a wrecker which made the job of getting it from the trailer simple, but nerve racking. The wrecker that came had a stick with a ceramic clutch. Needless to say, there was never a smooth moment. We had to pick it off the trailer, then back down a small but steep hill at a 45 to the shop door. With three of us, it took about 40 heart pounding minutes. But here she is!

    20160213_115605.jpg

    As you can see there is two large boxes attached to the mill. While this may be practical in a facility, it just looks clunky and super un-sexy. Really messes up the feng-shui of the shop. So after we got it sat down here, I unbolted the rear box and hung it on the wall. As you can see I'm in the middle of finishing the inside of my shop. Which makes this more of a challenge at the moment.

    So the rest of the pictures are the insides of the boxes.

    This is what I call the power supply box. I don't really understand everything in here. But I think the power comes in at the top right with the disconnect/fuse. The small black boxes to the left of it are relays to turn the motor on and off. The very top left corner is a hobbs meter. I'm not sure about the three small fuses(possibly just for the motor) Then the big box at the bottom is a transformer. I think this transforms to 110v for the outlet on the bottom right that I assume powers the CNC control. Just above the large transformer on the right side is the plug for the spindle motor. It is hardwired, no switch on the motor!

    I don't know how to really proceed from here. If I wire in my VFD before this box, wouldn't varying the Hz play havoc with the relays and transformers in this box?

    20160214_182617.jpg


    This box is mounted on the right side of the machine and seems to contain all the CNC equipment.

    Jim I think from looking at your pictures that the bootom left component in here is the power supply(has two D battery sized caps) The large Blue cap looks like a suspicious add on? Two gold boxes side by side at the bottotm look like the motor relays?

    20160214_182407.jpg

    I have many more pictures just ask!

    Also is there an easy way to adjust the brake? I wanted to remove the tool in the spindle and it seems the brake isn't holding.
     

    Attached Files:

  19. JimDawson

    JimDawson Global Moderator Staff Member Director

    Likes Received:
    3,714
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Sandy
    State:
    Oregon

    -Return to Top-

    Yes it would. You would replace the reversing contactor (big relays, top center), with the VFD. Leaving the rest of the major components intact. I need to study this a bit more. The small fuses and the relay to the left of them are unknown function at this time. I copied the pictures and will post annotated copies later.

    Not really, normally the only fix is to replace the brake shoes. Put it in back gear, this will normally provide enough resistance to loosen the drawbar.

    Looks like you need the straighten out the X axis motor mount. I thought that looked bent in earlier pictures.
     
    95ttoplt1 likes this.
  20. 95ttoplt1

    95ttoplt1 United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    18
    City:
    clarksville
    State:
    Tennessee

    -Return to Top-

    I think I figured out the brakes(operator error).

    The X bracket is slightly bent. The fella I bought it front had his dad helping him move shops and he was a bit a Tim Taylor. He banged that into the wall and bent it, then dropped the chain on the fan of the motor and broke it. So a couple little things to fix up.

    So I would run single phase power into this box, through the cutout/fuses and to the input of the VFD. Then I should be able to use the same push button switches to activate the VFD for motor on and off. But what about reverse? I think I'd ditch that transformer and just run a separate 110v plug for the control. The only issue I can see with this would be emergency stop. Does that need to kill power to the control as well?
     
  21. JimDawson

    JimDawson Global Moderator Staff Member Director

    Likes Received:
    3,714
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Sandy
    State:
    Oregon

    -Return to Top-

    OK, here's some new pictures. This is easy to convert from 3 phase to single phase. Just don't connect the center leg and presto, single phase.

    Somewhere there must be a FOR/REV switch in the system somewhere.

    The relay that is marked ??? may be the E-stop. The E-stop should kill the servos and the spindle motor, but leave the computer and other controls hot. The relay board should have an E-stop input

    upload_2016-2-15_19-16-51.png

    upload_2016-2-15_19-16-19.png
     
    95ttoplt1 likes this.
  22. 95ttoplt1

    95ttoplt1 United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    18
    City:
    clarksville
    State:
    Tennessee

    -Return to Top-

    Jim I'm sorry I didn't post this picture with the first. I thought it was evident in the first picture, but its hard to see. This is mounted just the to the right of the turret above the table.

    20160215_215655.jpg

    Here is some more pictures inside the power supply box. Those relays are 120v?? These are labeled "remove" on your picture.

    20160215_215913.jpg

    How they are currently wired.

    20160214_182635.jpg

    This is a close up of the mystery relay.

    20160215_215949.jpg

    A close up of the transformer at the bottom

    20160215_220005.jpg

    How its currently wired.

    20160214_182630.jpg

    And the mystery fuses.
    20160215_220012.jpg
     

    Attached Files:

  23. 95ttoplt1

    95ttoplt1 United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    18
    City:
    clarksville
    State:
    Tennessee

    -Return to Top-

    Jim I can certainly take more pictures. I really appreciate your help. Even though I'm young my eyes go to crap in the evening so its hard to see good enough to take decent pictures. I know this looks really easy to you, but I opened that power supply box and pee'd a little. I rewire hotrods for a side job, but DC in a car is a different world than this AC stuff. I'm just not familiar with it.

    If I remove those relays, and wire in my VFD there. How will I turn the spindle on and off. I don't have a remote for the VFD. I bet my VFD could use the buttons to toggle on and off and reverse.

    Its a OMRON 3G3MX2-AB022-V1 . I'll see if I can attach the literature with it.
     
  24. 95ttoplt1

    95ttoplt1 United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    18
    City:
    clarksville
    State:
    Tennessee

    -Return to Top-

    Omron literature. This was recommended by the local electrical shop, and it seems to have lots of the top end features of the AD GS# series, and some other stuff I don't understand haha.
     

    Attached Files:

  25. derf

    derf Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    259
    Trophy Points:
    63
    City:
    Delphos
    State:
    Ohio

    -Return to Top-

    I'd leave the motor contacters where they are, just bypass them because there is plenty room in the box for a VFD. The contactors will come in handy if you need to run an auxiliary fan to the spindle motor. You don't need a transformer, just 120 v in for the computer on a separate dedicated circuit, and 240 single phase for the VFD. The "mystery " relay is probably for M codes( flood coolant and mist coolant) or I use one circuit for a shop vac.
    Mine looks just like that, but it's all crammed into 1 box.
     
    95ttoplt1 likes this.
  26. Jim_Hbar

    Jim_Hbar Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    17
    Trophy Points:
    8
    City:
    Salmon Arm
    State:
    British Columbia

    -Return to Top-

    It looks like that 3phase box was setup to be the sole power connection for the whole machine - I suspect the "mystery relay" is for the control power, and it has/had hard wired e-stop(s).
    It's an awful big can to hide a lonely little VFD !
     
    95ttoplt1 and JimDawson like this.
  27. JimDawson

    JimDawson Global Moderator Staff Member Director

    Likes Received:
    3,714
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Sandy
    State:
    Oregon

    -Return to Top-

    That's interesting. Looks like the mill was wired for 480V, so you are going to have to wire the motor for 240 volts and switch the transformer to 240V. On the transformer, there should be 2 link bars between the center screws, you just need to connect it like the diagram on the transformer.

    The motor should be a dual voltage 230/460, 9 lead motor. Right now, I expect that the incoming power wires are connected to L1-1 ,L2-2, and L3-3. and 4-7, 5-8, 6-9 are connected respectively for 460V. For 240V, you would connect L1-1-7, L2-2-8, L3-3-9, and 4-5-6 connected together.

    The relay (spindle motor starter) coils are 120V, but they were switching 480V. The spindle motor starter is a reversing starter with an interlock to prevent the possibility of engaging forward and reverse at the same time, that's why it's so complex looking. It's really just a 2 way switch. The VFD replaces all of that. 2 wires in one end (from power), and 3 wires out the other end (to the motor), plus the grounds of course.

    The power end of this machine is really simple. The controls side is going to be more interesting and figuring out how the control side and the power side interact is going to be fun without a wiring diagram. The good news is that all of the wires in the power side are numbered, so not to bad to trace,

    You should be able to use your existing buttons for the VFD. I have not downloaded the manual yet, but I will so I can work through this with you. There should be a way to wire a 3 button control with E-stop. We're going to make a controls engineer out of you. ;)

    What we need to figure out is what powered up the servo drive system, the 1000VA transformer seems a bit light for that task, but maybe not. Earlier you mentioned running the controls end off of a 120V wall outlet, that is not a bad idea, that's the way I run mine. In that case, the only thing you would need in the power cabinet is the disconnect, the VFD, and the E-stop relay.

    .
    .
     
  28. 95ttoplt1

    95ttoplt1 United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    18
    City:
    clarksville
    State:
    Tennessee

    -Return to Top-

    Okay I read over everybody's comments 2 or 3 times until I kind of understand them. I went out this morning and looked at the box again with your comments and mind. I did see where it looks like it had 460 volt in so I've converted the wires going into the transformer to the 240 Volt setting. And I also disconnected where the fuses went to the relays. The fuses now go to the transformer and to the VFD. All the relays are ran off 110v converted from 240v 1ph pre VFD.

    The contactor side of the relays are fed with 240v 3ph post VFD. Since this isn't the control side of the relay it should be fine correct?

    I'll climb up and wire the motor for 240v this afternoon. Its nap time!

    Going into the VFD I have to hook up L1 a neutral and a ground. Which wire is which coming out of my breaker box? I have a ganged 30amp breaker with two wires coming out and the green connected to the common bus bar.
     
  29. JimDawson

    JimDawson Global Moderator Staff Member Director

    Likes Received:
    3,714
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Sandy
    State:
    Oregon

    -Return to Top-

    Not sure what you mean by ''contactor side of the relays''. Just to clarify the terms: A motor starter consists of a heavy relay(s) (contactor), and overload relays. The overload relays are behind the little black things (heaters), labeled H? 28 (a little hard to see in the pic), the terminals are labeled T1,T2, and T3. From the overload relays, the wires connect to the motor. Power normally comes in the top of the motor starter (L1, L2, L3), and out the bottom (T1, T2, T3).

    It looks like in the pictures that the motor is connected to a receptacle on the cabinet. This is where the VFD should be connected. The VFD should not be connected to the motor starter at all. Remove all of the incoming and out going black wires going to the motor starter, you can leave the red ones connected for now, as well as the cross connected black wires. The motor starter should be left completely inert for now.

    In the U.S.A, there is no neutral used in a 240V residential wiring system. You have L1, L2, and a ground. Neutral is only used in a 120V circuit, and it comes from the transformer center tap on the power pole. The common color code for 240V wiring is Black, Red, and Green for ground. White is normally only used for neutral.

    Just for consistency I consider black as L1, and red as L2, green is of course ground. If you have a black and white wire connected to the breaker, then mark the white wire as red, normally red tape is used for this, but a red magic marker would work. The red tape is normally available at any hardware store electrical department. Just as a side note, a 30 amp breaker requires the use of #10 wire.

    I'm going to be in my shop making piles of chips, so I may be a bit slow to respond to further questions. Others please feel free to jump in here.
    .
    .
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2016
  30. 95ttoplt1

    95ttoplt1 United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    18
    City:
    clarksville
    State:
    Tennessee

    -Return to Top-

    OK I went back out and took a look and more picture. My though was that If I wired in the VFD between the fuses and the Motor Starter relay was that everything that was only using single phase and 110v in the box would still be using that, and where three phase was previously I have replicated that again. This way the control panel and everything else would work as it did before without completely rewiring the machine. The relays wouldn't see the Hz variation on the control side and should remain stable? The HZ variation would only be happing on the side it it connecting. Maybe I don't understand how these relays work. I am assuming the 110v are pulling the relay closed, connecting L1,l2,l3 to t1,t2,t3. The relay wouldn't know or care to the voltage or HZ on the connecting side, only the 110v side. Would this not be the case?

    Jim how would I turn the spindle on and off if I remove those two relays and wire in the VFD as you describe? My control panel on the side of the machine would be completely out of the equation correct?I would have to rewire all that into the VFD or get a remote panel for the VFD?
     

Share This Page