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1958 Bridgeport Series 1 J Rebuild

Discussion in 'BRIDGEPORT MACHINES INC. & B'PORT CLONES' started by RandyM, Apr 19, 2011.

  1. RandyM

    RandyM United States Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    At the encouragement of others on this site I am going to expose my lack of knowledge and goofy ideas on the refurbishing of my 1958 Bridgeport series 1J. I am not completely green to machine tools but lack experience. I am very adept to tinkering with mechanical things. So here is my story. I got lucky last month and purchased my mill off of Craig's list. Probably over paid for it considering what I have learned since ($3500). I really like the fact it is single phase 110v. Once I got it home and off the trailer using my 2 post auto lift. I proceeded to move it into position by using several pieces of ¾ inch conduit under the base and just rolled it into position. I already knew the turret and ram were rusted solid to each other before the purchase. Here are the photos of day one.







    View attachment 41821

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    Mill-1.JPG Mill-2.JPG Mill-3.JPG Mill-4.JPG Mill-5.JPG
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 27, 2012
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  2. RandyM

    RandyM United States Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    So now as I really start to look at it the machine is really quite dirty with 50 year old oil that has turned to varnish, and probably over a coating of light rust to boot. The way wipers are completely wore out. And chips are in places they shouldn’t be. Someone sure enough injected grease into the oil passages, time for a rebuild. I proceeded to purchase the “Renovating the Bridgeport Series 1 J Milling Machine†manual from Industrial Control and Automation. http://icai-online.com/ This is a great book! I highly recommend this manual to anyone wanting to know the intimate details of their machine. In my opinion it is perfectly done. It walks you through everything about this machine. Then when you have friends come and inspect they interject their 2 cents, “You really should put a coat of paint on that thing.†Ok, maybe you have a point, now is the time to do that. Once I get it back together the last thing I want to do is tear it apart again.

    At this point I made the decision to do this rebuild in two steps, the basic machine and the spindle head. Trying to keep track of all the parts in their various groups was going to be hard enough. I am starting with the basic machine as I am planning on re-attaching the spindle head to aid in the evaluation and disassembly. Here are the photos of the basic machine disassembly.

    Screws and Misc.JPG Saddle-1.JPG Saddle-2.JPG Saddle Parts.JPG RH Crank Parts.JPG Table Removal.JPG
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 10, 2011
  3. RandyM

    RandyM United States Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    The turret and ram required two good weeks of soaking in PB Blaster, a little sledge hammer persuasion (with a block of wood), and port-a-power ram. But I got her. The cause of this mess, mice had built a very cozy home in the ram and well, you know.

    Ram and Turret.JPG Ram-Turret Teardown-1.JPG Ram-Turret Teardown-2.JPG
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 10, 2011
  4. Largo

    Largo United States Active Member Active Member

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    Oh, man - a freakin' car lift! I'm lucky if I can get my old Horrible Fright cherry picker to work!

    I'm jealous, and you sir - SUCK!

    Brian
    Taxachusetts
     
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  5. RandyM

    RandyM United States Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    LOL. Sorry, didn't mean to distract you. LOL. Maybe this will help, just try and stay focused on the topic. ;) Just trying to help. Taxachusetts? I think we are all in the same boat there.
     
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  6. oscer

    oscer Active Member Active Member

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    Hey Randy I like your hat ! My machine shop is very small and has to share space with JD 4110 and implements. I just went through part of what of what you are doing. I didn't strip everthing down to bare metal before painting. only stripped the ram and turret they were flaking pretty badly. The rest of the mill got a good cleaning and two coats of Massey Ferguson grey. I have a set of feednuts for the X and Y axises, they are both shot . If you are going to need a set they are surprisingly cheap, only $33 per set From Gosinger 866-385-2798. You probably have dealers alot closer though. the other thing I found was that the bottom of the saddle is scoffed up some. I don't know how this is going to affect the operation of the mill but it does bum me out some cause everything else seems to be in very good shape.I'm waiting for the paint to dry so I can put it back together and try it out.
    How is the bottom of the saddle on your mill? I supose this is a common wear spot.
    Good luck with your rebuild.
     
  7. RandyM

    RandyM United States Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Oscer,
    I am not stripping all the paint either. Just some sanding and then two coats with a foam roller. It is working out pretty well. You are correct, the bottom of my saddle has the most wear, but not bad. The screw nuts are in good shape, except that I damaged one taking it apart, socker just did not want to come out of the bracket. I am pretty sure I can salvage it.

    Us JD guys need to stick together, come join us on DeereTalk.com, link in my sig.
     
  8. oscer

    oscer Active Member Active Member

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    Thanks for the link Randy, I just checked it out and registered. I put the bridgeport back together yesterday, when I was finished I had 2 ,1/4-20x 1/2" round head screws left over :-\ I don't remember where they came from. they wre in the bin with the saddle parts so they must go on the saddle somewhere. Where there little clips that hold the oil lines out of the way of the feed nut assembly? I don't have any parts left over to attach with these screws so I'm not sure where they came from.
    My feed nuts pushed out of the casting with very little help from the arbor press, the new ones are slightly different, they are 2 peice set to adjust backlash and you have to drill the oil holes and turn the groove for the oil to get down to the lower nut. I should take more pic. but I never think of it when I'm working.
     
  9. RandyM

    RandyM United States Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Boy, extra parts, not sure I would like that. I don't think I can help you with that one. My machine does not have remote oiling, so no clips or bolts. I too have a hard time remembering to take pictures, seems get in my way of progress.
     
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  10. RandyM

    RandyM United States Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Knee Removal

    More disassembly, here is the knee coming apart.

    Knee Removal 1.JPG Knee Removal 2.JPG Knee Removal 3.JPG Knee Removal 4.JPG
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 10, 2011
  11. RandyM

    RandyM United States Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    ReAssembly Begins

    Parts are clean and painted. Time to put them back together. Here is the start.

    Base Painted.JPG Base & Knee Assy 1.JPG Base & Knee Assy 2.JPG
     
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  12. RandyM

    RandyM United States Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I decided to tap the base 3/4-10 for leveling bolts. I used threaded rod topped by a polished stainless steel acorn nut. I roll pinned them together. I am using a jam nut to lock them in place. The other photos are of the table bottom and the knee nut and assembly.

    Knee Assy.JPG Base Foot.JPG Knee Screw & Nut.JPG
     
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  13. oscer

    oscer Active Member Active Member

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    Nice job Randy, what did you do to the bottom end of the threaded rods if any thing? I havn't leveled mine yet.
     
  14. RandyM

    RandyM United States Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Thanks Oscer, the threaded rod is just cut off square with generous chamfers for now. I may add feet later. They work out really well, no machine wobble and everything is all level. I also like the fact that the base is up (1 inch) off the floor for cleaning and moisture.
     
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  15. Kennyd

    Kennyd United States Active User Active Member

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    Very nice job Randy! Love the pictures...I hope mine looks as good when I get it home!
     
  16. Kennyd

    Kennyd United States Active User Active Member

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    Oscar-I have a 4110 also ;)

    Randy invited me here from the DT site-please post up some pictures of your tractor over there as well :D
     
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  17. RandyM

    RandyM United States Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    It is going together

    Sorry for the delay Guys. You know how life can get in the way sometimes. The main machine is getting very close now, basically I only have the ram left to paint. I decided to go with a two tone paint scheme. The blue is powder coated by myself. The raised letters are matched paint done with a foam trim roller. I also have made a couple of upgrades, a power table feed, and a metal shelf in place of the fiber board. Still chuggin' along. Enjoy!

    Bearing Bracket.JPG Cross Slide Dial 1.JPG Door.JPG Knee & Saddle.JPG Shelf in Base.JPG Table & Knee.JPG Table Power Feed 1.JPG Table Power Feed 2.JPG Turret Mounted 1.JPG Turret Mounted 2.JPG Turret Spider.JPG
     
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  18. Tony Wells

    Tony Wells United States Vice President Staff Member Administrator

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    Very nice, Randy. I wish all the 58's were as nice as yours turned out.
     
  19. RandyM

    RandyM United States Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Thanks Tony, it is killing me to not be making chips. I have been wanting a mill for a long time and I guess a few more weeks won't hurt anything. And I am hoping that once this is finished it should be minimal maintenance from here on out.
     
  20. RandyM

    RandyM United States Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Well Gang, I am still at it, slow but sure. Here are some update photos of the spindle and drive head. I want to get the drive as far along as possible and then I will tear into the spindle.

    Head_Disassembly-2.JPG Motor.JPG Head_Removal-1.JPG Head_Removal-2.JPG Head_Removal-3.JPG Head_Disassembly-1.JPG
     
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  21. RandyM

    RandyM United States Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I haven't given up yet, still hanging in there Gang. The gear and belt housings are all back together and ready for mounting. The motor is rebuilt, new bearings, brushes, commutator, barrel switch, cord, and a fresh coat of paint. The spindle housing is fully disassembled. Here are the latest photos.

    Belt_Housing_2.JPG Gear_Housing.JPG Spindle_Housing-Front.JPG Spindle_Housing-RH_Side.JPG Spindle_Housing-Parts.JPG Belt_Housing_1.JPG
     
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  22. Tony Wells

    Tony Wells United States Vice President Staff Member Administrator

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    Looking really nice, Randy. New ones weren't assembled with such care.
     
  23. RandyM

    RandyM United States Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Thank you Guys. :)

    Mayhem, up until this poor economy thing these machines were rare around here as well. But, they are really showing up a lot more lately.

    I completely agree, I am finding that I am learning all the little things that make this machine work. It is a great experience but, is killing me to not being able to make chips.
     
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  24. brucer

    brucer Active User Active Member

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    randym,

    your rebuild looks to be going well, i actually like that color of blue your using, kind of grows on you after you look at it a little...

    i'm fixing my clutch cam pins at the moment, i have 2 good cam pin holes and i'm going to go ahead and drill and tap 2 more 1/4-32 holes so i have a spare set when i put it back together...

    my question is how tight did you tighten the bearing retainer nut, and lock nut.. i copied your photo from above and put some red arrows on it so you know what i'm talking about.. any help would be great.

    Belt_Housing_2.JPG_thumb.png
     
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  25. RandyM

    RandyM United States Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Brucer, I really didn't put a torque wrench on it. I just snugged her down real good. I really don't think this machine was ever touched maintenance wise. So with that being said, everything was still factory tight. I found nothing really came apart really hard, except the stuff that was rusted together (turret and ram). Sorry I took so long to get back to ya. Any particular reason you are asking?
     
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  26. brucer

    brucer Active User Active Member

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    i rebuilt the top housing and i used new retainer nuts..

    i ended up just snugging them down tight and running it.. it seems fine..
     
  27. Brett Zahler

    Brett Zahler Steel Registered Member

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    That's looking real nice! I just got a 58 also ;0 just going thru it and making every thing work as it should before I paint it
     
  28. miguel aprendiz

    miguel aprendiz Active Member Active Member

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    que buen trabajo , me gusto mucho todo lo que hiciste , la maquina quedo muy bien , que precio tiene ? gracias
     
  29. Tony Wells

    Tony Wells United States Vice President Staff Member Administrator

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    Randy, he says that's good work, and he likes what you've done. He's curious about how much you've spent on the project.
     
  30. RandyM

    RandyM United States Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Thanks Tony and Miguel.

    Well, to be honest, I really am not keeping track. Paid to much for the machine to start $3500. I am replacing all the bearings and stuff that wears out. I added a power feed to the x-axis. Had the motor rebuilt and then all the little things that I broke taking it a part. My guess, and I am guessing probably another $2000. Yup, adding up.
     
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